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The Golden Globes are airing this Sunday and that means a night of honouring the best in TV and film. While the Globes have previously been considered a preview of what’s to come with the Academy Awards, in recent years the two award shows have begun to show marked differences. In the past 10 years, there have only been three instances of the Golden Globes and the Academy Awards choosing the same Best Picture, including Slumdog Millionare (2008), Argo (2012) and 12 Years A Slave (2013).

While the Academy Awards tend to play it safe, the Golden Globes are known for awarding more groundbreaking and unique performances in movies. Plus, the Golden Globes serve alcohol during the show, so the speeches are *a lot* more entertaining.

We also can’t ignore the fact that Golden Globes gave Leonardo DiCaprio his first award 11 years before the Oscars. Come. On.

Check out the nine times the Golden Globes got it right and the Academy Awards didn’t, and watch the Golden Globes hosted by Jimmy Fallon on Sunday, Jan. 8 at 8 p.m. ET on CTV.

BEST ACTRESS 1999

Golden Globes Winner: Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth

Academy Awards Winner: Gwyneth Paltrow, Shakespeare In Love

Gwyneth Paltrow’s role as a theatre lover-turned Shakespeare-lover in Shakespeare In Love was one of her best performances, but no one could compete with Cate Blanchett’s gritty turn as Queen Elizabeth. What was truly odd and coincidental was Joseph Fiennes playing the main love interest in both films.

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BEST FILM 2006

Golden Globes Winner: Brokeback Mountain

Academy Award Winner: Crash

While many movie goers were stunned with the late Heath Ledgers’ transformation as the Joker, anyone who saw his stirring role as reclusive farm hand Ennis Del Mar in Brokeback Mountain knew what Ledger was capable of. With heart-wrenching performances from all cast members, director Ang Lee used a soaring backdrop of empty mountains to drive home the isolation and loneliness of the love story between two ordinary men.

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BEST ACTOR 2006

Golden Globes Winner: Bill Murray, Lost In Translation

Academy Award Winner: Sean Penn, Mystic River

Bill Murray’s understated role as American Bob Harris in Sofia Coppola’s Lost In Translation marks one of the best roles in an already highly accomplished career. Murray’s on-screen chemistry with Scarlett Johansson is visceral, bringing the viewer into his confusing and exciting new world in Tokyo.

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BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS 1960

Golden Globes Winner: Janet Leigh, Psycho

Academy Award Winner: Shirley Jones, Elmer Gantry

Thanks to Janet Leigh’s iconic role as a woman on the run, no one has been able to take a shower without the odd moment of panic for the past five decades. Surely that should be worthy of an Oscar.

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BEST FILM 2015

Golden Globes Winner: Boyhood

Academy Award Winner: Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

Both Boyhood and Birdman brought something new and exciting to film making, but we have to tip our hats to Richard Linklater’s ambitious and long-sighted exploration about the formative years of a young man. Shot over 12 years (12 years!), Linklater’s contribution to ‘coming of age’ films was something truly extraordinary.

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BEST ACTOR 1996

Golden Globes Winner: Tom Cruise, Jerry Maguire

Academy Award Winner: Geoffrey Rush, Shine

Quick, recite three of Tom Cruise’s lines from Jerry Maguire. Now recite three of Geoffrey Rush’s lines from Shine. Exactly.

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BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR 1999

Golden Globes Winner: Tom Cruise, Magnolia

Academy Award Winner: Michael Caine, Cider House Rules

Tom Cruise’s second instance of getting robbed at the Oscars was courtesy of his memorable role as the eccentric motivational speaker Frank in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Magnolia. While Michael Caine gave a solid performance in Cider House Rules, the movie, unlike Magnolia, was somewhat forgettable.

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BEST ACTRESS 1959

Golden Globes Winner: Marilyn Monroe, Some Like It Hot

Academy Award Winner: Simone Signoret, Room at the Top

Not only did Marilyn Monroe not win an Oscar for her iconic role as Sugar Kane Kowalcyzk, she wasn’t even nominated. Even more surprising, the Hollywood A-lister was never nominated for an Academy Award.

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BEST FILM 2010

Golden Globes Winner: The Social Network

Academy Award Winner: The King’s Speech

Sure, Colin Firth’s role as the stammering head of the Royal Family was award-worthy, but as a whole, it’s difficult to compete with David Fincher’s engrossing and captivating retelling of the origin of Facebook. Both films were based on true historic events, with one focusing on a speech that helped calm the British people during difficult times, while the other was based on something that forever changed the world. Unfortunately, the Academy Awards declined The Social Network’s friend request.

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