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Summer may be mostly over, but it ended on a high note for the group of 15 sculptors who just broke the world record for creating the tallest sandcastle in the world. Canadian Patricia Leguen was one of the artists called on by Germany’s largest travel agency to design and construct the castle. The team worked eight-hour days for two weeks, but all that work paid off when their 16.7 meter castle broke the world record by almost two meters.


‘People are amazed because they figure it’s special sand, like it can’t be ordinary sand, but it’s just mixed with water and packed really tight,’ Leguen told CTV, ‘It’s very calming, you get into the zone and you just concentrate. You don’t think about anything else, you don’t think about time.’

The artists constructed the castle layer by layer using 3,500 tonnes of compacted sand, starting the design at the top using cherry pickers. Leguen was the only Canadian in the group which also included sculptors from Italy, Hungary, Portugal, Ukraine and the Netherlands. It may be the tallest sandcastle in the world, but the structure is also set apart by its intricacy. According to Leguen, the last castle to break the record–constructed in India–was nothing in comparison.

‘The one in India was not really carved as intricately as this one,’ she said, ‘This one, there were no loose ends anywhere on the structure. It was all carved from top to bottom.’ Leguen spent eight days on the project, working primarily on the bottom sections which include a turtle and turtle eggs.


The castle will be on display for the rest of the month and will be bulldozed at the end of September. We suppose that’s better than having to watch the art deteriorate. For Leguen, the best part of the whole experience was showing the general public how sculptures are made.

‘The children were in awe and a lot of people were applauding us when we were carving,’ she said, ‘It was a great feeling to be able to carve in front of people and to show them how it’s done.’

Being from Canada, Leguen has also created quite a few ice and snow sculptures in her time so she’s no stranger to working with difficult materials. We wonder if the winter will bring more record-breaking art.

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