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Carrie Fisher, the actress best known as Princess, then General, Leia Organa in the Star Wars franchise, died on Dec. 27 at the age of 60, after suffering a heart attack days four days earlier.

Anyone watching the news or checking their Facebook or Twitter feeds on Dec. 23 got the devastating news that the actress went into cardiac arrest while flying from London to Los Angeles.

We got some hope when we heard she was in stable condition because anyone who knows Fisher’s story knows what a fighter she is. But, alas, tragedy struck.

Family spokesman Simon Halls released a statement to People on behalf of Fisher’s daughter, Billie Lourd: “It is with a very deep sadness that Billie Lourd confirms that her beloved mother Carrie Fisher passed away at 8:55 this morning. She was loved by the world and she will be missed profoundly. Our entire family thanks you for your thoughts and prayers.”

Fisher’s sisters Joely and Trisha Leigh Fisher have also broken their silence on the tragic news.

CP Images
CP Images

Fisher touched people in so many ways, from her Star Wars co-stars and other actors, to women in general, for her strong, unapologetic, badass portrayal of Leia. But what many may not know about was her fight against mental illness and addiction.

In what was her final open letter, published by The Guardian on Nov. 30, Fisher doled out advice to a reader struggling with bipolar disorder. She explained how she herself avoided accepting her own bipolar diagnosis for years, but attending support group meetings—which she initially hated—helped share the burden.

“We have been given a challenging illness, and there is no other option than to meet those challenges,” Fisher wrote. “Think of it as an opportunity to be heroic—not ‘I survived living in Mosul during an attack’ heroic, but an emotional survival. An opportunity to be a good example to others who might share our disorder. That’s why it’s important to find a community–however small–of other bipolar people to share experiences and find comfort in the similarities.”

CP Images
CP Images

Hollywood’s own took to Twitter to express their grief:

Carrie is survived by Lourd, her mother, Debbie Reynolds, brother Todd Fisher, half-sisters Joely and Tricia Leigh, and beloved French bulldog, Gary, who will be cared for by her daughter. RIP, Carrie. The world already isn’t the same.

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