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When was the last time you had even the slightest craving for raw chicken?

I’m going to take an educated guess and say that you’ve probably never wanted to try a slimy piece of rubbery meat. Because no matter how much you might love eating sashimi, you most definitely know the dangers that come with eating raw chicken: food poisoning, salmonella, E. coli and other harmful bacteria that could make you sick for a very long time.

So prepare yourself for some shocking news: Restaurants in Japan and the U.S. are serving patrons “chicken sashimi,” which is really just thin slices of raw chicken that have been boiled or seared for 10 seconds.

Nope! Just nope.

It’s so gross, it doesn’t seem real, does it?

You might remember the hilarious Facebook post that joked about eating medium rare chicken strips a few months ago.

It went viral because it was so outrageously disgusting that, at the time, it seemed unrealistic. But chicken sashimi has, for some reason, become reality.

According to Michael Doyle, a professor of food microbiology at the University of Georgia, cooking chicken for 10 seconds “is an insufficient treatment to kill harmful microbes such as campylobacter and salmonella.”

Even the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan told people not to eat uncooked chicken this past summer, and that it isn’t safe to consume unless it reaches an internal temperature of 165F.

Surprisingly, most places that serve the dish are actually high-end restaurants. The founder of Ippuku, a restaurant in California that serves raw chicken, claimed they get top-quality, fresh chicken from local farms.

As if that’d be enough to coax you into trying it. Because no matter how fresh raw chicken is, it just isn’t worth the risk.

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