News World
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

According to Michael Wolff’s scandalizing bookFire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,  which was published last week, pretty much everyone who has ever met Donald Trump thinks he’s unfit to be president. And he is not taking it well. Over the weekend he sent out a barrage of tweets calling the book and its author “fake” and “a total loser.” We’ve seen Trump go after people who are against him before, but watching him defend his own mental prowess was even worse. Let’s just say, we don’t think he convinced many people.

In a series of three tweets, the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES said that his two greatest assets are his “mental stability and being, like, really smart.” He also said that his previous accomplishments would qualify him as “not smart, but genius….and a very stable genius at that!”

Let that sink in.

As shocking as it should be to hear the president say those phrases in all seriousness, this is also the guy who tweeted at North Korea last week that his nuclear button is bigger than theirs. So we’re not overly surprised. The real question here is: why on earth would you think shouting “I’m a genius” is the best way to show people you’re mentally stable? That wouldn’t work on a group of 10 year-old bullies on the playground, why would it work on political analysts, government officials and journalists?

Still, Trump’s subordinates at the White House came out in full force to defend him and assert that those tweets were definitely a demonstration of superior mental capabilities. Most notably, White House adviser Stephen Miller showed up to a Jake Tapper interview with one goal in mind: show the president how much he loves him. After 12 minutes of praising Trump as a genius, Tapper finally had to cut him off and tell him to stop wasting his viewers’ time. Cue the commercial break.

To wrap up the weekend, Trump sent out another pair of confusing tweets that didn’t exactly help build his case that he’s a genius or mentally stable. He was quoting from a New York Post article by Michael Goodwin and confused “consequential presidency” (which Goodwin says Trump’s is) and “consensual presidency” (which we assume is what you get when you actually win the popular vote). Then he tweeted an email address instead of the link. He (or a staff member?) later fixed both errors but thankfully, Twitter-users got screenshots of the originals.

 

 

COMMENTS