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Move over fidget spinners, there’s a new toy in town. Slime is in and it’s probably the only thing your kid is going to want to pack in their pencil case come September.

First off, yes, it’s exactly what you’re picturing: a semi-gooey ball of, well, slime, that you squish and poke and mould into different shapes. Think of it as the modern-day version of Gak or Play-Doh. But it’s not just radioactive-hued, green slime a la Ghostbusters’ Slimer. In fact, people are getting creative and adding some glam to their slime:


There are also vibrant, metallic versions of it:

I think I might sell these in 4 oz portions? Also I can’t think of a name

A post shared by Theresa🌿 (@rad.slime) on

And people are even adding in pearls and beads (sound on to truly appreciate the slimy effects):

what’s your favorite food? 🤔🍇 (via: @snoopslimes) follow me @slime for more #slime ⬅️

A post shared by slime videos ← (@slime) on

Soothing, right? Well apparently, playing with slime and even watching others play with slime is loaded with health benefits. There’s a nice, relaxing popping sound from any air bubbles, and the texture, which is stretchy and not overly sticky or moist, feels good to touch. Perfect for relieving anxiety and stress, and supposedly helps to trigger ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response), which is where sensory stimulation helps your body relax. It’s kind of like using a fidget spinner — a simple activity to distract the hands — but a little less dangerous.

There’s also cold, hard cash to be made in the slime biz, too. According to the Daily Mail, Karina Garcia, a California-native, is raking in upwards of $100,000 a month from her YouTube tutorials on how to DIY slime. And there are seemingly endless recipes to make the stuff. Some popular ingredients include white glue, shaving cream, contact lens solution, cornstarch, foaming hand soap and of course, food colouring.

Instagrammers are going gaga for the stuff, too. The hashtag #slime has over 4.5 million posts, and some accounts dedicated to slime, like @glitter.slime, have thousands of followers.

Keen to swap your kid’s fidget spinner for slime? Here’s a natural and relatively simple DIY tutorial to get you started. Happy sliming!

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