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Mink, foxes, rabbits and raccoons can all breathe a little easier; Gucci is going fur-free. The Kering owned label (that’s the huge mega conglomerate that owns McQueen, Balenciaga, Saint Laurent, Stella McCartney, Puma and a few of your other favourite brands) signed the Fur Free Alliance — an international coalition of 40 animal protection organizations aiming to end the exploitation and killing of animals for fur.

For once, the internet rejoiced.

“Being socially responsible is one of Gucci’s core values, and we will continue to strive to do better for the environment and animals. With the help of HSUS and LAV, Gucci is excited to take this next step and hopes it will help inspire innovation and raise awareness, changing the luxury fashion industry for the better,” said chief executive and president Marco Bizzarri.

They’re in good company, joining fur free brands like Calvin KleinRalph LaurenTommy Hilfiger and Armani. Bizzarri told BoF that he believed fur was outdated. “Creativity can jump in many different directions instead of using furs,” Bizzarri said. It was a strategic move too, with Gucci noting that millennial consumers are more ethically-minded than generations before them. “I need to do it because [otherwise] the best talent will not come to work for Gucci,” Bizzarri continued.

Also noteworthy is the company’s €1 million donation to Unicef’s Girls Empowerment Initiative. The platform explores scalable solutions to the many problems facing adolescent girls mostly living in the developing world, enriching their lives and strengthening their impact on their communities. Unlike other male dominated industries, over 60 per cent of Gucci’s employees are women–they also comprise more than half of the senior management positions at the company.

“What we realised is, when you have diversity in a business context you create value. If you have women and people from different cultures and gender diversity, it’s creating value and fostering creativity,” Bizzarri said. “There is a business impact as well. It is proven.”

Well, we know where we’ll be splurging.

 

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