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You might know of The Man Who Wore All His Clothes, the humorous children’s book by Allan Ahlberg, where a man, for reasons not entirely clear, wears all his clothes and ends up saving the day because of it. In real life, a British man was recently arrested in Iceland for trying to board a flight while wearing all the clothes that wouldn’t fit in his checked luggage. Unfortunately, this story doesn’t have quite the same happy ending as the book.

Ryan Carney Williams (a.k.a. Ryan Hawaii on Twitter) was recently held up at Iceland’s Keflavik Airport because he was wearing a few too many layers — eight pairs of pants and 10 shirts, to be precise. The reason he was so bundled up wasn’t because he was cold, but rather, because he was unable to pay the baggage fee required to check his extra possessions and get him home.

British Airlines, however, didn’t see Williams’ solution as a practical one and decided to prevent him from boarding his flight. So he took to Twitter in protest.


Here’s a video showing just how he layered the outfit. (Note the stylish and functional use of the shirt sleeves as scarves.)


After accusing the airline of preventing him from boarding his flight due to racial profiling, British Airways denied the situation had anything to do with race. “The decision to deny boarding was absolutely not based on race,” the airline stated. “We do not tolerate threatening or abusive behaviour from any customer, and will always take the appropriate action.”

Williams then left the airport, only to return the next day with a ticket on a different airline, EasyJet. But when he arrived, he found his reputation for causing a disturbance had preceded him, and he was once again turned away at security.


Apparently the captain of the flight had heard about the disagreement in the airport the day before and decided not to take a chance by letting Williams aboard, a decision EasyJet’s customer service stood by.


The British artist and clothing designer did eventually find his way home via a more accepting Norwegian airline.


If anything, his story serves as a reminder to pack your luggage and read the airline’s rules and regulations extra carefully. That, or end up missing your flight because security was suspicious when you piled on a few too many outfits.

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