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Update(s): Well, a lot has happened since yesterday. Where do we begin?

Let’s start with Harvey Weinstein’s wife. Marchesa founder, Georgina Chapman–she who, according to Weinstein just days ago, “will be with [lawyer] Lisa [Bloom] and others kicking my ass to be a better human being”—has decided that she is not, in fact, going to kick his ass–at least not in the way he was thinking–and is, in fact, leaving her husband.

Her statement to People magazine reads: “My heart breaks for all the women who have suffered tremendous pain because of these unforgivable actions. I have chosen to leave my husband. Caring for my young children is my first priority and I ask the media for privacy at this time.”

Matt Damon has come to his own defense, insisting that he did not try to kill a 2004 Weinstein expose. Speaking to Deadline, the actor explained the situation surrounding the article in question, and made his position clear, “This type of predation happens behind closed doors, and out of public view. If there was ever an event that I was at and Harvey was doing this kind of thing and I didn’t see it, then I am so deeply sorry, because I would have stopped it.”

Brad Pitt confirmed his role in the Paltrow/Weinstein/Pitt encounter. Not like we didn’t believe Gwyneth in the first place, but you know how some people (not us) need a guy to give the nod? Yeah.

Lindsay Lohan inserted herself into the storyline, because why not, Insta-storying, then quickly deleting, a couple of videos showing support for the beleaguered mogul:

“Hi, I’m in Dubai, I’m home. I feel very bad for Harvey Weinstein right now. I don’t think it’s right what’s going on.”

“I think Georgina needs to take a stand and be there for her husband. And he’s never harmed me or done anything wrong to me. We’ve done several movies together. So I think everyone needs to stop. I think it’s wrong. So stand up.”

Um, ok. Good to know. Thanks for that Linds.

We’re pretty sure the debacle hasn’t slowed down while we were writing this, so be sure to check this space; we may be back.

 

A lot has happened since The New York Times published their exposé on producer Harvey Weinstein, and the subsequent allegations of sexual harassment and assault by women who either worked for him, with him, wanted to work with him, or happened to be in his vicinity when he happened to fancy them.

Harvey took a leave of absence from The Weinstein Company as the NYT story dropped, but the company went a step further a couple days later and fired his a** — despite a “desperate” email sent by Harvey, begging for support from Hollywood CEOs and bigwigs in and around the industry. Which, apparently, no one was willing to touch or even entertain.

With one exception, actually. Designer Donna Karan seemingly blamed the victims and what they may have been wearing for Weinstein’s predatory behaviour. She issued a statement shortly after the interview was published, saying her remarks were taken out of context and blardy-blardy-blah, but this is the kind of thinking that needs to be shut down and the speaker of such needs to be called out and put on blast.

Ahh, Rose McGowan. The actress was mentioned in the NYT report, and is believed to be one of the women with whom Weinstein settled following an incident in a hotel room in 1997. She has become an outspoken advocate for women’s rights and was one of the first to call for the entire board of The Weinstein Company to resign. Because while Harvey was the alleged instigator, THEY were his financial backers, covering up and settling lawsuits for decades.

Speaking of cover ups, The Wrap‘s Sharon Waxman reported that back in 2004, when she was a new writer for the NYT, she got the green light to work on a story on Weinstein’s sexual misconduct. But not only did Harvey reportedly threaten to pull advertising from the paper, Waxman states that she was also pressured by Weinstein, Matt Damon and Russell Crowe to bury it. Which she did.

And while no one has really taken on Damon or Crowe just yet (it’s early days, though), others are speaking up. Since Weinstein’s alleged assaults have come to light, stars have come out and issued their statements on the matter. Stars who have worked with him closely, many of whom stated that they had no idea that this was how Harvey operated but are disgusted by his inexcusable behaviour and abuse of power. Whether you buy their claims of ignorance or not is another question.

From Meryl Streep, Dame Judi Dench and Glenn Close, to Kate Winslet, Jennifer Lawrence and George Clooney, the stance — for the most part — has been the same. Harvey and his actions are gross — but they didn’t experience nor were they aware of it. At least that’s what they’re maintaining. Did they suspect or hear rumours? Perhaps, though the level of depravity was unfathomable, perhaps unbelievable, possibly leaving room for doubt. Does that make those who had heard the rumours and did nothing complicit? It depends on who you ask.

While the cover-ups were, and are, heinous, there’s a power play involved that is, sadly, a normal thing in Hollywood and beyond. The whole casting couch scenario isn’t a made-up one and it’s been happening for decades. That rich history doesn’t excuse it; on the contrary, it makes it all the more upsetting. We as human beings need to be better. Women shouldn’t be made to be afraid to speak, and men should be fighting right alongside them.

The company board members, the people who helped cover up Harvey’s disgusting deeds, Damon, Crowe, those who had suspicions but didn’t speak up until he was fired — sure, they deserve to be dragged around for months, some possibly fired or blacklisted; it’s a culture that has to die. But let’s not lose focus, they are not the main villain here today. Not even close.

To date, these women have come forward:

Ashley Judd
Asia Argento
Lauren Sivan
Jessica Hynes
Rosanna Arquette
Mira Sorvino
Ambra Battilana Gutierrez
Emma de Caunes
Lucia Evans
Gwyneth Paltrow
Angelina Jolie

Ugh. Now that other women know it’s safe (well, safer) to share their stories, as many did in the New Yorker piece, we have a feeling this is just the tip of the iceberg. We’ll be watching for more updates, but in the meantime, we’ll leave you with this:

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