Life Parenting
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For the most part, you look at your child or children and think how wonderful and smart and sweet and adorable they are because in spite of their messy rooms, picky eating habits and growing attitudes, they really are pretty great. But then there are days when you wonder why you became a parent and think (fleetingly; or not, whatever, we’re not judging) that if there was a store where you could trade them in, you’d be there, first in line.

Because having kids sometimes means you can’t have nice things. Or just regular things. Somehow, in spite of their size and inability to open a ketchup bottle, children can magically summon brute strength and break things. Easily. They also know how to destroy your dreams — by destroying your things.

If you’ve ever had a child take a pen or crayon or marker (always of the permanent variety) to a wall, we feel your pain. Perhaps you covered it up with some new paint. Or put a bookcase in front of it. Or screamed until you were blue in the face, as the realization hit you that it’s ruined.

Or maybe you just said f*ck it and embraced it.

That’s what neurosurgeon, professor and dad Eric Massicotte’s wife did when their kid turned a wall into a canvas. But instead of lose it, she transformed it into a work of art.

OK, “work of art” might be used a little loosely there, but you get the idea. And formally displaying the “Interrupted House” is next level and kind of genius. Hopefully it doesn’t encourage their kids to colour on walls and that the Massicottes went on to buy a chalkboard or easel with lots of paper and (washable) markers for the little angels to channel their art into a more focused place. The Massicottes prove that parenthood can be messy but you don’t have to be a mess. If only we could all be this patient and understanding.

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