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After a day of travelling, relaxation mode seems to kick in almost immediately once you step foot into a hotel. You’ve already made it through the hard stuff — a long drive with kids requesting bathroom stops every 10 minutes or a bumpy flight followed by a never-ending customs line.

But your home away from home might not be as safe as its glossy, marble floors and smiling staff led you to believe, especially if you rely on that tiny metal security box in your room to protect valuables.

In just one minute and 26 seconds, a YouTuber called LockPickingLawyer reveals how easy it can be to break into a Saflok safe, one of the most common security boxes used in hotels.

LockPickingLawyer places a bottle of alcohol into the safe, closes the door, uses the keypad to create his own four-digit code, and the safe locks. Then, he tries entering a random number that isn’t his own, and the safe won’t open. Sounds normal, right? Most of you have probably tried exactly that to ensure your stuff is safely stashed away before leaving the hotel room to explore.

But then the video goes on to explain that there’s actually an administrator code that can override any secret password entered just in case a forgetful guest can’t recall their code. However, most hotels neglect to change the factory settings for the master code, so when any old person puts the safe into “super user mode” (which is done simply by pressing the button to the right of the zero twice) and enters the generic stock setting password “999999,” the safe unlocks.

So, anyone with access to your room who knows this little hack can potentially override the safe and take whatever valuables you deemed worthy of being locked up — passports, jewellery, electronics or cash.

“If you’re ever in a hotel that has one of these Saflok products and you need to use it to lock up some of your valuables, it might be a good idea to make sure the hotel reset the administrator password before relying on it to protect your goods,” LockPickingLawyer says in the video.

You’ve got to imagine there are other hacks like this one for a variety of other safe brands too. Maybe the best place to store valuables is still in that good old-fashioned spot: under the mattress.

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