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Computers were expected to usher in a paperless age, where physical possessions wouldn’t really exist.

It was once assumed that photo albums, for example, would be replaced by files on a machine, records by mp3 players and paper with programs like Microsoft Word. But according to the author of The Revenge of Analog, that hasn’t actually been the case.

Sales of vinyl records and turntables have been soaring since they hit their lowest point in 2006, Sax says. And bands around the world have been feeling it. Patrick Pentland, with Canadian rock band Sloan, notes that not only has there been an “increase” in sales lately, but the band also offers most of its catalogue on vinyl. In fact, they’ve even offered a deluxe vinyl box set for their album One Chord To Another.

But it’s not just records. There’s a new and growing appetite for all kinds of physical items, like real photographs that you can hold, or books with actual pages. In the video above, Sax explains why he thinks people are gravitating back to analog, even as the digital age continues to rise.

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