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Guys, we love Karlie Kloss and all, but we can’t help but wonder what the heck she was thinking by participating in this recent fashion shoot for Vogue.

In the March issue of the fashion staple, the 24-year-old dressed as a Geisha — complete with a Shimada-styled wig and a flowing kimono. In one photo she’s posed next to a sumo wrestler; in another she’s walking down the stairs of a tea house. In all of them she’s got a painted white face, making us all face-palm from the descriptions alone.

The real irony of the photo shoot though isn’t the cultural insensitivity or that it comes in a year when multiculturalism is perhaps more relevant that ever. It isn’t even that people in this day and age believe painting your face to look like another culture is okay. It’s that this March issue of Vogue was supposed to be about celebrating diversity.

We think they failed that mission, huh?

Readers thought so too, because the online backlash was quick and swift. People took to Twitter to protest the shoot, prompting Vogue to remove the photos from their website.

It seems as though Kloss didn’t actually realize how offended people would be by the spread, and when she got wind of the strong reactions she quickly took to Twitter too, in order to issue a personal apology.

That’s fine and all, but we think Kloss either needs to get a better manager or she should begin educating herself a little more. Because, as one Twitter user pointed out, this isn’t the first time Kloss has put on an offensive outfit for a show.

 

We’ll say one thing: Vogue may have expected a better reaction to this “diversity” issue and the spread itself, but at least it’s getting the conversation going about what’s appropriate and what isn’t when it comes to fashionable taste.

So there’s that.

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