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Leonardo da Vinci is credited as being one of the greatest minds of all time. His contributions to society include masterpieces like the Mona Lisa, The Last Supper and the Salvator Mundi, which just sold for $450M US at an auction. His inventions also helped to lay the groundwork for the helicopter, the parachute, scuba diving gear and more. But a new book appropriately titled Leonardo da Vinci, which whittles down 7,200 pages of the creators musings into a 524-page tome, points to the first great ‘slashie’ (inventor/painter/sculptor/astronomist) as something of a beauty enthusiast on top of it all.

According to author Walter Isaacson, da Vinci’s notebooks explain how to dye one’s hair a lighter shade…in the late 1400s. Turns out even one of history’s greatest minds wanted to change up his hairstyle.

On a busy page full of loopy, left-handed scribbles (he wrote right to left because of his left handedness), there is a surprisingly easy-sounding recipe for his beauty hack. Da Vinci’s secret to blonder hair: boiling nuts in oil. Huh.

“He is in his 30s, he’s really good looking, has curly hair and he’s afraid of going grey,” Isaacson told CTV News.

So while visiting a stylist to balayage lighter strands will ensure a professional look, boiling a pot of nuts in oil and presumably soaking the hair in the liquid may yield similar results.

Da Vinci doesn’t get specific with the type of nut or oil he used with success, but with Christmas around the corner, a pot of chestnuts boiled in hazelnut oil will at the very least smell delicious, even if you don’t end up with golden locks a la Blake Lively.

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