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If you’ve ever mused about having a more delicate nose or sharper cheeks or bigger boobs, you’ve probably wondered how exactly said change would look on your body. Take your idea to a plastic surgeon and you’ll be shown photos of other people who’ve had similar work done. “Oh, and don’t they look fab!” Sure, but they aren’t you.

There’s a new piece of tech, however, that helps people get a realistic sneak peek at how their procedure will look on them. VECTRA XT 3D Imaging System is a device that creates nearly real-time, highly realistic 3D models of patients’ bodies by simultaneously taking a series of 2D photographs with six cameras. The VECTRA spits out a 3D version that’s so high def, even freckles and pores can be seen when zoomed in on. Pretty wild, right?

Vectra

The device itself kind of looks like something out of Back to the Future that Marty McFly and Doc Brown would have strapped to the Delorean, but its purpose is a little more mainstream than time travel.

The technology has been used to preview breast enhancements since 2009, but the most recent version adds several tricks, making it more useful to doctors and specialists. In Toronto, for example, the Plastic Surgery Clinic uses VECTRA XT 3D to give prospective patients the chance to try on a new cup size or smooth out wrinkles on aging skin.

According to research by LA-based surgeon Dr. John Diaz (the findings are set to publish in The Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Journal), those of his patients who used VECTRA XT 3D prior to an enhancement were 100 per cent satisfied with how the machine worked for them.

The whole thing feels a bit like getting a temporary tattoo — a chance to try on a potentially permanent style or solution. Who wouldn’t want to see what their body would look like if they could change that “one little thing?” There’s no harm in looking.

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