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The boom in tech companies means that the competition for attracting talent is fierce. You’re going to need a lot more than a ping-pong table in the break room to attract the best and brightest to choose you. One company in Victoria, B.C. is adopting a five-hour work day to entice new employees and boost workplace productivity.

At RingPartner, employees are required to be in the office from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and any work they don’t complete in that time can be done wherever and whenever they want. That not only means more leisure time–or work time in your PJs–but it means parents of school-age children don’t have to coordinate or pay for before/after-school programs. With the number of households with two working parents, that could be a godsend.

Doesn’t this mean that less work is getting done? Not at all. The company’s CEO, Mike Williams, explains that he’s more concerned with the results of his employees’ labour than the amount of time they spend at their desks. And it looks like less time behind the desk makes people more productive.

‘It’s really about the value and the results that they can drive rather than the time that you put into the office,’ Williams told CTV. His strategy for enticing talent and boosting productivity isn’t unfounded either.

The Five-Hour Work Day is a book by the founder of Tower Paddle Boards, Stephan Aarstol, about what happened when he chose to switch his office to a shortened work day. He references Henry Ford’s transition of his workers from a 16-hour work day to the common eight-hour we still use today to attract the best workers in the country. That was over 100 years ago and Aarstol explains how shortening the work day even further improved his company’s growth and the lives of his employees. He also explains it in this shorter read and in the video below.

So we might see this shorter work day become more of a trend. It certainly won’t work in every office and it definitely won’t work in the service industry, but is this the next step for the entire tech sector? Maybe that’s something to think about if you’re considering a career change.

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