News Canada
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

The Bay of Fundy, between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, has the highest tides in the world with a 16-meter difference between high-tide and low. While it’s a really cool place to visit, you have to time it just right to see the tide you’re looking for. Street artist Sean ‘Hula’ Yoro is learning that first-hand while he paints a mural on a wall affected by the tide in the bay.

While painting a mural seems like enough of a challenge in itself, Hula is no stranger to painting on difficult canvases or under harsh conditions. He gained notoriety in the art community in 2015 for his huge and intricate water murals painted with non-toxic oil paint while perched on a standing paddle board.

That time I painted at the top of a waterfall 🌊 – @paytenpurdy

A post shared by HULA | sean yoro (@the_hula) on

Had fun painting this one in beautiful Porto Cesareo, Italy.

A post shared by HULA | sean yoro (@the_hula) on

One of my earlier murals / @a_a_r_o_n__a @kealiikeola @fantazyisland @makanacabana

A post shared by HULA | sean yoro (@the_hula) on


The municipal government in St. John, NB contacted Hula earlier this year after seeing his work featured on American news.

‘We sent him a message and said, ‘have you ever heard of the highest tides on the planet? Because we’ve got them here in St. John and we’d love to host you,” Victoria Clark of Discover St. John told CTV.

‘I’ve designed like 15 different pieces for this wall just because I was so excited,’ Hula said, ‘We’ve kind of narrowed it down to one but it was really exciting just to think of all the possibilities.’

Gotta get wet to find this mural under a bridge in West Palm Beach, Florida ‪-‬ ‪Painted for @canvaswpb‬

A post shared by HULA | sean yoro (@the_hula) on

🌊🎨 – one of my first water murals

A post shared by HULA | sean yoro (@the_hula) on


Since painting over water is old hat for Hula, timing the tides has proven to be the biggest challenge for the artist. As with everything in the bay, you kind of just have to go with the flow.

‘We’ve been out here at midnight, past midnight with headlamps,’ He said, ‘It’s definitely a project I won’t forget… We’ll catch a couple hours sleep here and there and then come back out. Everything depends on nature here.’

At low-tide–which is when Hula will be working–the mural will extend 27 feet above his head. As of right now, he’s marked out the grid for the piece and will be painting it over the course of the next week. The final product will probably be amazing–although it will only be visible 12 hours a day–but it looks like the process will be just as incredible. We wonder how well oil paints hold up under constant water erosion.

COMMENTS