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It’s devastating when one “misplaces” a loonie or two(nnie). (You  torture yourself thinking about all the things you could’ve purchased, like one of the many chocolate bars and chips that line the vending machine or a package of ramen noodles from Dollarama.) So imagine what the Bode museum, in Berlin, Germany, is feeling after realizing that thieves made off with a prized possession: a 100-kilogram Canadian gold coin named Big Maple Leaf.

Yes, you read correctly. Using a ladder, the cunning robbers got into the museum by breaking open a top-floor window. Then after making their way to the coin collection, the thieves broke the bulletproof glass that housed said coin, grabbed it and made a mad dash for the window. Apparently, they rolled it through the city’s light-rail tracks before disappearing.

Valued at $1 million, but currently worth close to $5 million, the coin (one of only six in the world) was loaned to the museum in 2010 and soon after became a permanent figure. Obviously, everyone at the Bode museum is devastated, especially Bernhard Weisser, the director of the Bode Museum’s Numismatic (coin) Collection.

“It’s an absolute catastrophe for the museum, an absolute catastrophe for us all,” Weisser said to the Globe and Mail. “It’s definitely a case that involved a high amount of criminal energy.”

Criminal energy indeed. Big Maple Leaf was produced by the Royal Canadian Mint and is “recognized by Guinness World Records for its massive size and unrivalled purity (999.99/1000 pure gold).”

Needless to say, Queen Elizabeth II, who also has a Canadian gold coin of her own, is keeping a very close eye on hers.

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