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If Time magazine wanted a riot on their hands, they would’ve put Donald Trump on the cover as their Person of the Year for the second straight year (though he was runner-up apparently, ugh). Instead, the mag went the complete opposite, infinitely better route and put the spotlight on much more deserving people. That’s right, people. Plural. Time has named “The Silence Breakers” as its Person(s) of the Year and it couldn’t be more perfect. And timely. The women and men who have been harassed, and abused, and assaulted, and raped and decided to share their stories and call out their assailants publicly–they were really the only choice.

Time‘s editor-in-chief, Edward Felsenthal, made the announcement during the Matt Lauer-less Today on Wednesday, saying they’re “the voices that launched a movement. This is the fastest moving social change we’ve seen in decades. And it began with individual acts of courage by hundreds of women — and men too — who came forward to tell their own stories of sexual harassment and assault.”

Felsenthal added, “One of the important things we explore in our coverage is… we look at the degree to which this is really just the beginning and how far it will go, how deep into the country, how long-lasting. The image that you see partially on the cover is of a woman we talked to, a hospital worker in the middle of the country, who doesn’t feel like she can come forward without threatening her livelihood.”

Featured on the cover are Ashley Judd, the first star to go on the record to the New York Times about Harvey Weinstein‘s deplorable behaviour; Taylor Swift, who testified against her assaulter in court, after he sued her for losing his job; former Uber engineer Susan Fowler, whose whistleblowing blog post ultimately led Uber CEO Travis Kalanick to resign and the multibillion-dollar start up to oust at least 20 other employees; corporate lobbyist Adama Iwu, who organized a campaign after she was groped in front of several colleagues at an event and no one stepped in to stop the assault; Isabel Pascual, a strawberry picker who is using a pseudonym to protect her family; and a hospital worker who is also a victim of sexual harassment, there anonymously, yet a shining symbol, representing all those who feel like they can’t speak out.

The women couldn’t be any more different, but they all have one awful thing in common.

“The people who have broken their silence on sexual assault and harassment span all races, all income classes, all occupations and virtually all corners of the globe,” Time‘s site reads. “Their collective anger has spurred immediate and shocking results. For their influence on 2017, they are Time’s Person of the Year.”

Not on the cover but just as important are others inside the issue: Rose McGowan, who was emboldened by Judd, and helped bring to light what is going on in show business; Alyssa Milano, who tweeted out #MeToo, launching a rallying cry of solidarity for those who’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted; social activist Tarana Burke, who first used the phrase “me too” a decade ago, as part of her work of building solidarity among young survivors of harassment and assault; Megyn Kelly, who complained to Fox News execs about Bill O’Reilly‘s treatment of women; Selma Blair, whose harrowing tale of the threats she received from James Toback will have you seeing red; the seven female employees of the Plaza in New York, who’ve filed a harassment suit against the hotel; and so many others.

What Rose says. Forever and ever.

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