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With housing costs absolutely skyrocketing and new mortgage laws leaving more and more first-time homebuyers in a perpetual renting lurch, it’s been a rough few years for wannabe home owners out there. So when we hear a story like this it kind of gives us all hope.

Some savvy people managed to 3D-print an entire 409-square foot, circular house in Russia recently, and the whole thing took less than 24 hours to physically complete. As if that wasn’t crazy enough, it turns out that the house was way more cost effective in terms of labour and material than a traditional house too. As in, it only cost them $10,134 to do it.

Apparently the house was built by Apis Cor in the middle of the country, which allowed for a crane-sized mobile 3D printer to come in and print out some special mortar mix under a heated tent. In the end it worked out to roughly $25 per square foot (as opposed to the current cost of $150 per square foot in the USA or $140-$160 in Canada if you’re doing your own build). Sounds great, right?

Well before we go celebrating all of the 3D houses we’re going to buy, we should probably hold our horses — just a little. Given how tight many of the current plots of land are for builds, it’s unrealistic to think we’re going to just fit crane-sized 3D printers on tiny streets and intersections, even if it is for merely a day.

Second of all, only this one, futuristic design has worked so far and it’s not for everyone. Sure there are edges on the interior to maximize living space and large, open ceilings. But a small, circle house with a flat roof isn’t exactly a one-size fits all. (Heck, there isn’t even a white picket fence.)

For now though it’s a great start to a larger problem, which is essentially what 3D printing has been offering for years. We seem to have been on the brink of printing organs, food and other essential items for years now but nothing has become mainstream.

With more and more kids growing up learning how to code and with new printing materials being made available, we’re aware that this could very well change in the near future. But something tells us that for now and in the foreseeable future we’ll still be stuck renting or stockpiling all of our life savings in order to afford an abode.

Still, we’ll concede that this is a very promising development.

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