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Hurricanes are deadly events and the United States has seen more than their fair share in the past month. Harvey, Irma and now Maria have devastated parts of the country, caused thousands to evacuate and left people without homes and the basic resources of survival. The government repeatedly claims to be doing all they can to aid the areas affected by the hurricanes. While that may be true, mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz of San Juan, Puerto Rico said on Friday that it’s not enough and the bureaucratic hoops she’s had to jump through to get aid are wasting precious time.

‘We are dying, and you are killing us with the inefficiency,’ she said in a news conference, ‘I am begging, begging anyone that can hear us, to save us from dying. This is a people-are-dying story.’

Trump did not take kindly to those criticisms of his leadership and shot back on Twitter–while at his New Jersey golf club–attacking the mayor personally and suggesting that Puerto Ricans are waiting around for the rest of the U.S. to do the work of recovery for them.

It is worth noting here that Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory, meaning that the island is populated with 3.4 million American citizens. A poll shortly after Hurricane Maria hit revealed that about half of Americans do not realize that Puerto Rico is part of the United States.

As of now, less than half the island has drinkable water, almost none of it has power and over a third of gas stations are non-functional. They are also still evacuating towns without water supplies and hospitals where generators are failing.

Government response was noticeably slower to Maria in Puerto Rico than Harvey and Irma before it. On such an isolated island, that slow response time is costing human lives. It took the president days to tweet a message to the victims, as he was too busy last weekend railing on the NFL to acknowledge that there were thousands without access to drinking water in Puerto Rico.

There is also trade legislation–called the Jones Act–that requires all goods shipped between U.S. ports to be carried by U.S. ships. Since this limits aid, as soon as the storms hit, people began calling for Trump to waive it for the time-being. He took eight days to act.

Considering the botched handling of government response and Trump’s attacks, people were not at all happy with the president and sprung to Cruz’s defense.

Trump is scheduled to visit Puerto Rico on Tuesday to see relief efforts first-hand.

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