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Donald Trump’s racism is no secret to most of us (although many would have you believe it doesn’t exist) but he took his xenophobia to a whole new level Wednesday when he retweeted three unverified anti-Muslim videos from a far-Right extremist group in the U.K. The videos were of instances of violence supposedly enacted by Muslims on non-Muslims to incite fear of Islamic terror. The videos’ origins are unverified and were retweeted from the account of Jayda Fransen, a leader in the far-right organization Britain First.

Fransen was arrested two weeks ago on four charges of religiously aggravated harassment at a rally over the summer. In 2016, Fransen was convicted of the same charge when she accosted a woman wearing a hijab. Britain First is known for its anti-Muslim rhetoric (under the guise of “anti-terrorism”) and its ideas were of some motivation to a man who shot, stabbed and killed U.K. Member of Parliament Jo Cox in June 2016.

Fransen responded to Trump’s attention by posting that Donald Trump had validated their cause by retweeting to his “around 44 million followers.” She also posted a video appealing to Trump to intervene and save her from prison for her racially-motivated harassment charges.

These messages and Trump’s endorsement of them are dangerous. By retweeting a fringe anti-Muslim group, the President of the United States has legitimized their hate speech. He has given the highest platform in the world to racism and violence.

The White House defended Trump’s retweets with Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders saying that it doesn’t even matter if the videos were authentic (at least one has been proven not to be) because the “threat” is.

“Whether it’s a real video, the threat is real and that is what the president is focused on, is dealing with those real threats,” Sanders told reporters, “Those are real no matter how you look at it.”

Through a spokesman, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May condemned Trump’s retweets saying, “Britain First seeks to divide communities through their use of hate-filled narratives to peddle lies and stoke tensions. They cause anxiety to law abiding citizens. British people overwhelmingly reject the prejudiced rhetoric of the far right, which is the antithesis of the values that this country represents: of decency tolerance and respect. It is wrong for the President to have done this.”

May was in the Middle East on a foreign trip and also addressed the incident personally in a speech she made in Jordan. She stressed the importance of the U.S.-U.K. relationship but said she would “not be afraid” of criticizing Donald Trump over the “hateful” videos. He shot back at her on Twitter (and at first mistakenly tagged a different Theresa May, just to make things worse).

Trump is set to make a visit to the U.K. at some point during his presidency (although the date is TBD) and British citizens, leaders and lawmakers are calling for May to disinvite the U.S. president over this incident. May has said she will not discuss the trip, but that has not stopped British MPs and mayors (including the London mayor who Trump has attacked on Twitter before) from making their stances known.

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