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Beer is a Canadian staple, we practically need it to survive.

So then why are some of us paying almost $30 more for a 24 than the province next to us? We’ve found prices for a case of Molson across the nation and cross-referenced that with provincial alcohol consumption data. In other words, we’re looking at who’s really getting gouged at the liquor store. Here is what we found:

The price of a 24 of Molson varies pretty widely across the country. The cheapest 24 in Canada can be purchased in Quebec for $26.99 and the most expensive is $56.65 in the Northwest Territories. The reason for the big discrepancy? Varying taxes and transportation costs. Between these two extremes there is some more nuanced pricing. Ontario ($34.95) and British Columbia ($34.99) are relatively inexpensive. Prices rise a little in the sparsely-populated Prairies, with Manitobans paying $40.49, Albertans shelling out $44.99, and Saskatchewanians getting their drink on for $46.49.

These prices get a little more interesting when you start to compare them to provincial alcohol consumption. For example, Quebec, with the cheapest price for a 24 in the country also has the highest level of alcohol consumption (81.7% of its inhabitants report having a drink in the last twelve months). Alberta on the other hand with its expensive beer boasts similar drinking levels (80%), perhaps that degree of indulgence (despite the higher cost of beer) speaks to the province’s booming economy. Another interesting (regional) data point: PEI (72.7%), New Brunswick (73.3%), and Nova Scotia (73.8%) have the lowest level of alcohol consumption in the country.

We’ll see you in Quebec.

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