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According to a report by the United Nations International Labour Organization (ILO), people who work remotely, rather than in an office, may have a tough time separating work from the rest of their life. And they may literally be losing sleep over it.

Working anytime, anywhere: The effects on the world of work” is a collection of research from 15 countries that looks at the pros and cons of telecommuting, or working from “anywhere” at “anytime.”

It states that 42 per cent of telecommuters say they wake “repeatedly” during the night, compared to 29 per cent of good ol’ nine-to-fivers.

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Remote work can have its advantages, like flexibility and improved productivity, not to mention there’s no commute, but it also comes with its own stresses, which can lead to a lack of sleep.

“This report shows that the use of modern communication technologies facilitates a better overall work-life balance but, at the same time, also blurs the boundaries between work and personal life, depending on the place of work and the characteristics of different occupations,” Jon Messenger, co-author of the report, said in a press release.

In other words, despite the shorter or non-existent commute, the flexible work hours, or the fact that they’re still wearing slippers, people who work remotely aren’t any less stressed than the rest of us.

The research comes as a bit of a warning to remote workers and anyone who takes their work home with them, suggesting that it’s easy to justify unpaid overtime when it’s done after “business” hours from the comfort of your favourite couch.

Any way you slice it, it’s still work, and it’s important we separate it from our personal time.

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