Health Wellness
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You probably already know that there’s help out there for those times when you’re not feeling like yourself. Whether it’s depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts or something you can’t quite name, there are mental health resources you can access throughout Canada. The question is, how do you know which one to turn to and how to get in touch? We’ve got all the names, numbers and links you’ll need right here so that you can find support for yourself or for someone you love.

Your provincial mental health helpline

Each province in Canada has its own comprehensive site where you can do online assessments to get more information about how you’re feeling. You can also find easy to access information and quick facts on PTSD, depression, anxiety and many other disorders on each site, plus a directory for mental health services across your province. You’ll even find options to call, chat online or email a mental health professional — whatever you’re most comfortable with. Ontario’s site is here, Alberta’s is here and B.C.’s is here. There are also sites for Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Yukon, Northwest Territories, Quebec, Newfoundland, New Brunswick, PEI, Nunavut and Nova Scotia.

Your Life Counts Online Lifeline

Google not coming through for you? Use this site to search by province for phone numbers and contact information for mental health services across Canada. The website even offers a service designed specifically to help members of the military and first responders.

The Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention

CASP will link you to specialized crisis centres in each province and connect you to someone that you can talk to and trust.

Kids Help Phone

Teens and kids can call 1-800-668-6868 or get in touch online to receive 24/7 support in both French and English for issues like bullying, abuse, sexuality and gender identification and much more.

Anxiety Panic Support

This peer-to-peer anxiety support network lets people chat online with someone who understands their experiences in dealing with anxiety. It’s another place that you can turn to on a 24-hour-a-day, seven-days-a-week basis for mental health help.

The Mood Disorders Society of Canada

Mental health advocates, educators, researchers and peer trauma counsellors unite under this banner to provide support, information and resources for people suffering from every type of mood disorder. You can participate in their forum, talk with a peer or use the site to find help in your area. Visit them on the web or contact them by phone or email here.

The Jack Project

Jack unites young people by focusing on ending the stigma attached to mental health issues. Their goal? Eradicate it completely within the span of a single generation. Since stigma is often the central reason that stops people from getting the help they need, Jack’s motto of ‘No more silence’ sends a strong message. Find a local chapter here.

156381-JACK_credit_The_Jack_Project_Org
The Jack Project Org

Crisis Line

Available to people in Ottawa and the surrounding counties, this is a toll-free, 24/7, bilingual number to call either to get help for yourself or advice in dealing with a loved one’s mental health issue.

Psychologist-recommended mental health apps

If you’re not ready to reach out to a real person, certain apps can be the next best thing. When it comes to a person’s well-being and mental health, the whole ‘there’s an app for that’ tagline really rings true. Apps come in a wide range of prices and cover topics from anxiety, addiction, depression, OCD and even suicide prevention.

Bell Let’s Talk

With initiatives designed for both youth and adults, Bell’s annual campaign aims to decrease stigma around mental illness, increase access to care, improve workplace mental health and raise funds for mental health research. Available year-round, the Bell Let’s Talk website is also a great resource for finding links and information about help and counselling across Canada.

It’s time we started talking openly about our mental health. Join the conversation on Bell Let’s Talk Day, January 25, and help end the stigma around mental illness. For every text message sent and mobile or long-distance call made by Bell Canada and Bell Aliant customers, Bell will donate five cents to Canadian mental health programs. The same goes for anyone sending a tweet using #BellLetsTalk, posting on Instagram using #BellLetsTalk, watching the Bell Let’s Talk video on Facebook, or sending a Snapchat using the Bell Let’s Talk geofilter. But talking about it is just the first step: Visit letstalk.bell.ca for more ways you can effect change and build awareness around mental health.