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Having a young child in your life means you have lots of opportunities for lessons on how to be a kind and courageous person. Sometimes these lessons can come via showing and sometimes these lessons come via telling.

Thankfully for those of us who might need a little help in the telling, there are any number of books that can help us to guide our little ones, as they grow into their best possible selves.

Here are 16 books for the little feminist in your life:

A is for Activist, Innosanto Nagara

From civil rights to LGBTQ rights to environmental rights, Innosanto Nagara’s book covers an alphabet of important issues that children will likely have questions about.

Best For: Readers with questions about the world around them.

Ages: 3 and up

Indigo

Marisol McDonald Doesn’t Match, Monica Brown

With brown skin and red hair and an unabashed love of burritos with peanut butter, Marisol McDonald doesn’t fit and that’s just fine with her. From her clothes to her biracial ethnicity, people keep telling Marisol she needs to pick one thing to identify herself – but Marisol is happy being exactly who she is.

Best For: Readers who don’t feel like they fit in anywhere.

Ages: 5 and up

Indigo

I Am Jazz, Jazz Jennings and Jessica Herthel

Written by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings, a young girl who has shared her story and become an important spokesperson for the trans community, I Am Jazz tells Jennings’ story and answers many questions young children may have about gender.

Best For: Readers who have questions about gender.

Ages: 5 and up

Indigo

Tia Isa Wants A Car, Meg Medina

A little girl wants to help her aunt save for a car, but it’s difficult when Tia Isa must make enough money to support the family around her and the family back in her home country. This emotional story shows the love and support families have for one another.

Best For: Readers who have family in different countries.

Ages: 5 and up

Indigo

For the Right To Learn: Malala Yousafzai’s Story, Rebecca Langton-George

Malala Yousafzai’s courageous story of standing up to the Taliban has now been made into a children’s book that young readers can be inspired by.

Best For: Readers who want to learn about the world.

Ages: 6 and up

Indigo

The Paper Bag Princess, Robert Munsch

After losing all her beautiful clothes, Princess Elizabeth throws on a paper bag, outsmarts a dragon and saves the Prince. Now that’s how you do a modern fairy tale.

Best For: Readers who love fairy tale endings.

Ages: 3 and up

Indigo

Not All Princesses Dress In Pink, Jane Yolen and Heidi E Y Stemple

At a time when world leaders are proclaiming that ‘women should dress like women,’ this book reminds children that what’s on the outside does not dictate what’s on the inside. Women wear pants. Women wear jerseys. In Not All Princesses Dress In Pink, they can wear baseball mitts with tiaras, too.

Best For: Readers who favor non gender-conforming outfits.

Ages: 4 and up

Indigo

The Name Jar, Yangsook Choi

Unhei has left her home country of Korea and is in a new country and school. Rather than ask her classmates to pronounce her ‘difficult’ name, she asks them to choose a name for her. Once her classmates find out that Unhei’s name has a special meeting, they ask her to teach them how to properly pronounce it.

Best For: Readers who feel out of place with their name or readers who are starting school soon.

Ages: 6 and up

Indigo

Matilda, Roald Dahl

For years, Roald Dahl’s feminist icon Matilda has been teaching millions of young readers that children’s voices are powerful and important. Put down by every adult in her life, Matilda uses her imagination and love of books to help herself and her friends make a better life for themselves, thanks to a little magic along the way.

Best For: Readers who are dreamers.

Ages: 8 and up

Indigo

Me…Jane, Patrick McDonnell

It’s easy to know the intimate details about celebs, but how well do we know the scientists dedicating their lives to making the world a better place? In his beautifully illustrated Me…Jane, writer Patrick McDonnell tells the story of a young Dr. Jane Goodall, who grew up dreaming of helping animals until she made her dream a reality.

Best For: Readers who are animal lovers.

Ages: 4 and up

Indigo

The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins

Before Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games was one of the biggest film franchises of all time, it was one of the most successful book series in recent years. Katniss Everdeen, the girl on fire, was not the only feminist icon in the books. Her followers, including many men who supported her bid for leadership, are also feminist role models. #TheyreWithHer

Best For: Readers with a political and societal interest.

Age: 13 and up

Indigo

Forever, Judy Blume

Judy Blume’s groundbreaking 1975 novel about a sexual relationship between teenagers is still considered taboo today. But the authors’ explanation of consent, sexual acts and birth control is also just as necessary and relevant almost four decades later.

Best For: The reader who needs to have ‘the talk.’

Ages: 14 and up

Indigo

Eleanor and Park, Rainbow Rowell

Eleanor is overweight, poor, and abused. Park is biracial and has never fit in. Together, the two teens embark on a moving love story that shows the power of friendship and acceptance in the face of discrimination.

Best For: The reader who doesn’t see themselves reflected in the media.

Ages: 13 and up

Indigo

Anne of Green Gables, Lucy Maud Montgomery

At a time when young girls were expected to dream only of marriage and babies, orphan Anne kept her sights set on University. Along the way, she changed her adoptive family’s mind about wanting a boy and nurtured her friendship with Diane. She even showed that Gilbert Blythe what happens when you cross a woman on a mission (we don’t recommend hitting anyone with a chalkboard, but it was pretty bad-ass at the time). Thanks to the popularity of Anne with an ‘E,’ the story has been reproduced as a graphic novel, a colouring book, and a children’s storybook (not to mention a TV series, but you can’t read that).

Best For: The reader who needs a young heroine.

Ages: 9 and up

Indigo

The Babysitters Club, Ann M. Martin

A series about preteen girls babysitting may not sound that revolutionary, but in Ann M. Martin’s books, supporting and encouraging friendships takes centre stage during difficult transitional years. Plus, these girls were business owners while they were still in training bras. Slay.

Best For: The reader who could benefit from the support of fictional friends.

Ages: 9 and up

Amazon

Rosie Revere, Engineer, Andrea Beaty

Rosie loves to make inventions, but when her latest gizmo doesn’t work, her Aunt Rose, the same woman from the iconic feminist poster, shares a valuable lesson — you only fail if you quit.

Best For: Readers who love to play with their hands and make their own inventions.

Ages: 5 and up

Indigo

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