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It seems like just yesterday that Corner Gas — the most successful scripted comedy to ever come from Canada — announced that it was cobbling together a movie, five years after the original show went off the air for good. Now, the countdown is on for the Dec. 3 theatrical debut and we can’t help but compare Corner Gas to another timeless classic: Seinfeld. Here are seven ways they’re more alike than you’d think.

It was a show about nothing

Everyone knows that Seinfeld was a show about nothing. Heck, they even had an entire storyline that featured the characters pitching a show about nothing to NBC. Well, as much as Corner Gas featured Canadian tropes and the odd storyline, it too was essentially a show about nothing. “Pencil stories” as Brent Butt liked to call them.

“Guy loses his pencil, spends 20 minutes trying to find his pencil, and at the end he finds his pencil,” he explains. “And within that, hang some great dialogue on it.”

Need more proof? Observe this clip of Corner Gas’ first ever scene:

The lead was a regular dude who observed the craziness around him

“I normally sit these things out,” Brent LeRoy can be heard telling the town during one scene in Corner Gas: The Movie. “You people make mountains out of molehills.” While that’s not entirely true (Brent has his moments throughout the series), he did typically react to what everyone else around him was doing. Jerry was the same way. Sure, he tended to have particular idiosyncrasies when it came to dating or his personal space and hygiene, but let’s just consider his crazy quota when compared with the likes of George or Kramer, shall we?

seinfeld1 seinfeld2

There’s still a hardcore fan base to this very day

Seinfeld is one of the most legendary comedies to ever air on NBC — right behind Friends and Cheers. So it’s no wonder that people still purchase board games, t-shirts or soup from places like Soup Nutsy just because it reminds them of the show’s Soup Nazi. Nostalgia is a powerful thing.

In Canada, Corner Gas is the most legendary scripted comedy of all time. Not only was it the highest-rated, but it also ended when Brent Butt was ready to end it — and not a moment earlier. So when the movie was announced earlier this year and a Kickstarter campaign was launched to help raise funds for film extras, no one should have been shocked with this happened:

 

The male and female leads never really got together, and we were OK with that

Elaine and Jerry, meet Lacey and Brent. Both had romantic undertones but neither couple was every really a thing. Or, we suppose in the case of the former couple, a thing for very long.

elaine1 elaine2 http://74flawsasofyesterday.tumblr.com/

They both did stand-up

Jerry played a stand-up comedian on Seinfeld, in addition to being one in real life. Brent was a stand-up in real life, but not on Corner Gas. Which would make this a little bit of a stretch, except for that one time in the Corner Gas finale, when Brent Leroy pursued his lifelong dream of being stand-up comedian.

http://seinsmelled.tumblr.com/

 

They both had interfering parents

As frustrating as Morty and Helen Seinfeld could be for the son, even at the best of times, at least they didn’t live in the same city. In Dog River, Brent ran into Oscar and Emma at every. single. turn. In both cases, the parents always thought they knew best … even when one of them was acting like a jackass, to paraphrase Oscar.

oscar

The characters could be jerks but we loved them anyway

On Corner Gas, even the nicest of characters could have a bad day, and that’s when you’d get situations like Oscar knees-deep in a hairball-scheme or Lacey showcasing a freakishly scary competitive streak.

jerk1 jerk2

 

Meanwhile on Seinfeld, it wasn’t an episode if something like this didn’t go down by the closing credits:

Corner Gas: The Movie hits select theatres from Dec. 3-7. And be sure to tune in to the televised broadcast on Wednesday, Dec. 17 at 8 p.m. ET on CTV.