Life Money
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

Every Canadian should have thought of this a long time ago.

Thanks to some crazy weather south of the border, a Massachusetts man is making cold, hard cash selling “historic” snow out of his backyard. That’s right, people are actually paying him to ship snow — the stuff any Canadian would be happy to pass off for free at this point.

“This is your chance to not only own a piece of history, but also help save Boston from #Snowageddon2015,” Kyle Waring, founder of ShipSnowYo.com, wrote on his website.

The business, shockingly, is proving to be a huge success. Waring’s website boasts that he’s already shipped 133 orders, and he was trending on Facebook early Wednesday morning.

The product line includes a water bottle stuffed with snow for $19.99, or a 6 lbs container of the stuff for $89.

But seriously, how did someone in the U.S. beat us to this amazing idea?! Just imagine if Torontonians sold ice from its famous ice storm last year, “straight out of the polar vortex, folks.” Any province could’ve pulled it off:

Here’s the real kicker though: Waring can’t even guarantee the snow will arrive as, well… snow. The packing and shipping process relies on dry ice, insulation and quick delivery to keep it frozen, but in some cases, that still won’t be enough.

“We’ll try our best to make sure your snow won’t melt, but we can’t guarantee that it will arrive exactly as packed (yet),” he wrote on ShipSnowYo.com

“…your snow shipment may arrive as water.”

There is no shipping in Canada (not that we’d want anymore snow, anyway), but his website advertises that his products can be shipped “to anyone in the U.S.”

There’s also a number of testimonials featured on the site, including one person apparently named Walter McKronkite who wrote, “Even though my snow arrived as water it was the best damn water I’ve ever had.”

What a missed opportunity.