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Theme restaurants are nothing new to the food industry, but in the past, they’ve been considered more about the gimmick and less about the quality of food. One restaurant is changing that idea, combining critically acclaimed dishes and an inventive way to serve food.

Quince, a French cuisine restaurant in San Francisco, has already earned three Michelin stars, an incredible achievement for any restaurant. And Quince is now giving patrons another reason to make a reservation at their restaurant. Instead of using traditional plates, meals at Quince are now being served on iPads. Yes, iPads.

At quince in SF the truffle course is a delicious #montessori work! #findthetruffle #michellin #backtoschool

A photo posted by montessoribrooklyn (@montessoribrooklyn) on

The screen savers correspond to the meal, which means white truffle croquettes (listed on the menu as ‘A dog in search of gold’) will be served on an iPad showing a dog running after truffles. You can also order frog legs, served on an iPad featuring a jumping frog. We’re not sure whether seeing the living animal you’re about to eat is a great idea for business, but it’s definitely unique.

The price fixe menu lists a meal price of $220 USD (around $295 CAD)… or half an iPad.

Chef @michaeltusk cleaning White Truffles for Tartufo Bianco Week here at Quince ! #truffles #quincesf

A photo posted by Quince Restaurant (@quince_sf) on

Chef Michael Tusk explained that the idea for serving food this way was inspired by the U.S. technology boom. “Living in San Francisco for over 20 years, I have witnessed the tech boom, and I wanted to combine a little bit of gastronomy with technology and a little bit of education,” said Tusk.

Wondering where the educational factor comes in? Well, each iPad dish teaches customers something unique about their food; for example, that the restaurant’s truffles are often found by trained dogs.

And don’t be too concerned over the sanitary issues arising from serving food on an iPad. The tablets slip into a box made by a local artist, with a clear screen separating the iPad and the food. The screen is sterilized between meals, allowing patrons to relax and instead focus on their delicious meals and in-plate entertainment.