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R. Kelly sat for his first interview since answering to 10 charges of aggravated sexual abuse against four women, three of whom were allegedly underage. Kelly spent three days in jail after turning himself in voluntarily in February, but has entered a plea of not guilty and maintains that all allegations against him are false. This most recent furor around R. Kelly was kicked off by the Lifetime docu-series Surviving R. Kelly which aired in January and featured 50 people including dozens of women who accused the R&B singer of strategically holding young girls and women hostage and sexually assaulting them.

On Wednesday CBS This Morning aired 10 minutes of Gayle King‘s more than 80-minute interview with the singer where he was adamant all the accusations are lies and that the allegations are a hit job meant to destroy him and his career.

During the interview, Kelly got heated and emotional to the point where he stood up and was screaming his innocence at the cameras and Gayle had to pause the interview for several minutes. Here’s how it all went down.

He went at it right away

Gayle opened by asking why Kelly chose to sit down with her. He got right into his most repeated claim: that these women — all of them — are lying.

“I’m very tired of all of the lies. I’ve been hearing things and seeing things on the blogs and I’m just tired,” he said.

He maintains he’s never broken the law

Kelly said he’s never had sex with anyone under the age of 17 and while he may have done “lots of things wrong” in relationships, he’s never done anything illegal.

He says he’s not a monster

Kelly pushed back on all the claims made in the documentary and the way he was portrayed.

“If you really look at that documentary – which I’m sure you have – everybody says something bad about me,” he said. “Nobody says nothing good. They was describing Lucifer. I’m not Lucifer. I’m a man. I make mistakes. But I’m not a devil and by no means am I a monster.”

He sees himself as the victim here

“You can start a rumour on a guy like me or a celebrity just like that,” he said, snapping his fingers. “All you have to do is push a button on your phone and say, ‘So-and-so did this to me. R. Kelly did this to me,’ and if you get any traction from that, if you’re able to write a book from that, if you’re able to get a reality show then any girl I had a relationship with in the past, that it just didn’t work out — she can come and say the exact same thing.”

The victim narrative ran throughout the interview, even at one point claiming his accusers’ parents had told him, “We’re going to destroy your career.”

When King called him on playing the victim, Kelly responded that it was just the truth.

“I need help,” he said. “This is the kind of help I need: I need somebody to help me not have a big heart because my heart is so big, people betray me and I keep forgiving them.”

He questioned why he would do the things he’s accused of

In his own defence, Kelly asked King and viewers why he, as such a public figure, would take the risk of holding girls hostage.

“I don’t need to. Why would I? How stupid would it be for R. Kelly – with all I’ve been through in my way, way past – to hold somebody, let alone four, five, six, fifty, you said. How stupid would I be to do that? That’s stupid, guys!”

At this point, he began yelling at the camera and at one point stood up. He continued until his publicist calmed him down.

He deflected

Kelly pointed to the fact that there are other girls who are missing and abused in an attempt to steer the blame away from himself.

“There’s real girls out there missing,” he said. “There’s real young girls that are being abducted, being raped. Okay? They really are on chains, they really do have chains on their wrists and they can’t get out and they’re ending up buried.”

He tried to make a sympathetic appeal

At one point, he tried to use his kids as human shields.

“This is not about music,” he said. “I’m trying to have a relationship with my kids and I can’t do it. Y’all just don’t want to believe the truth.”

It’s important to mention that his daughter, Buku Abi, called him a “monster” shortly after Surviving R. Kelly aired.

He’s living with two “girlfriends” right now

Gayle asked about Kelly’s relationship with two women — 23-year-old Joycelyn Savage and 21-year-old Azriel Clary — with whom he is currently living. Kelly (who is 52) said he loves them and they’re like his girlfriends. Their parents claim that Kelly has “brainwashed” them into staying with him.

“I love them and it’s almost like they’re my girlfriends, it’s like, you know, we have a relationship, it’s real,” he said. “And I know guys — I’ve known guys all my life who have five or six women so don’t go there with me, because that’s the truth.”

In response to Gayle asking about Savage and Clary being “much younger” than him, Kelly said he doesn’t see it that way.

“I don’t look at ‘much younger than me,’ I just look at ‘legal,'” he said. “I just look at ‘you’re you, I’m me’… One might be older than the other, one might be younger than the other. I just look at ‘legal.’ There are older men who like younger women and younger women who like older men. I’m an older man that loves all women.”

Public response

The explosive interview doesn’t seem to have shifted any of the public’s favour in Kelly’s direction. If we gained anything from it (other than gross soundbites of Kelly talking about legality), it’s an even greater respect for Gayle King.