Entertainment Celebrity
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

Going back to work after having a baby is a difficult transition for any mom. Amy Schumer is no different, and she’s using her platform to talk about the highs and lows of working after baby, and inspiring other women to share their stories too. Find your mom tribe, even if it’s with 9.3 million Instagram followers.

Since welcoming their son Gene five months ago, Schumer and her husband Chris Fischer have been sharing their journey as new parents on social media, from the super cute to the super relatable (ladies, steal allll the hospital underwear you can when you have the chance). Now Schumer is opening up about her decision to go back to work and the difficulties in finding the new normal of being a mom while still feeling like yourself.

“I’m feeling strong and good and like I’m still a human being with interests and ambitions and goals I’m excited to reach,” said Schumer, who writes that she went back to work when Gene was three months old (promptly getting mom-shamed for it) and admits that there were days when she cried because she missed him. Noting that she realizes she’s in a privileged position financially compared to most people, Schumer says “But it’s mostly good to be back and the breaks energize me to be a better mom and appreciate our time even more.”

The comedian asked her millions of followers what their experience returning to work post-baby has been like and the comments have been an inspiring and affirming read for any parent who is struggling with the transition.

Debra Messing wrote about returning to work on Will and Grace following the birth of her son Roman and said that she was lucky to be able to bring him to set and continue breastfeeding him on breaks, but noted that nights when the show was taped and Roman was at home were especially hard. “Omg, my body hurt from his absence. I felt a physical yearning, and I questioned myself, and felt guilty, and would cry. It was hard,” writes Messing. “I’d feel such moments of joy making people laugh. I’d get lost in the work and it energized me and empowered me. And then I’d get home and literally sprint to his crib and rock him, feeling like I was HOME. It’s hard, being a working mom. But I believe that we are better mom’s when we are able to do what fulfills us.”

Drew Barrymore says that the birth of her daughters meant a revision of what the actor saw as important. “I didn’t care about anything. Everything seemed trivial if it wasn’t about my kids,” says Barrymore, who added that things eventually fell into place. “Forever changed by a love that is indescribable! And it just seems to get better and better every day! I am no longer interested in myself as me. It’s being their mom. That’s who I am now.”

Celebrity chef Padma Lakshmi echoed Barrymore’s statements about a shift in priorities, writing “Having Krishna made me stop worrying about the little things.”

Actor Laura Benati praised Schumer for giving her followers an example of a working mom who “…isn’t crippled with guilt. We need more of that. (As you know) I struggled a ton and really could have benefited from a strong message like this from someone I admire.”