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Remember when Apple came out with the ULTIMATE health app last September? You know, the one that was going to help us track our sleep, count our steps and measure how many calories we consume on the daily? And how Apple’s HealthKit sent out another update six months later touting all of the upgrades it had made? It seemed strange (to at least roughly half the human population) that there was a a pretty big thing still missing.

Nope, we’re not talking about our copper intake or our inhaler usage. Those are both fully functioning measurements in the kit.

We’re talking about that little thing that affects nearly every woman in the world for half of their lifespan: their menstrual cycle. It seemed pretty freaking strange that a program designed to track all aspects of our personal health left menstruation and ovulation out, non? For females using the app, we could tell how much manganese was in our systems, but not which day to head to the store and stock up on tampons. Or more importantly, whether we might be late or ovulating.

But here’s the good news on the horizon, we think: Apple has finally joined the ranks of Period Tracker, Kindara, Clue and all those other third party apps by recognizing that women exist.

At least that’s the word from Apple’s Worldwide Developer’s Conference, which took place on Monday. At the event, the senior vice-president of software engineering, Craig Federighi, quickly glossed over some of the HealthKit improvements, including ways to track UV exposure, hydration and reproductive health.

What kind of reproductive health? Well, we’re still not sure, since it really was only mentioned in passing.

 

 

 

Still, it sounds like Apple finally realized what most of us have known our whole lives — that women DO exist.