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It looks like online clothing giant ASOS have made a major booboo – and Twitter users are not happy about it. In images for larger-sized undergarments, it looks as though a model had her body padded out in order to fit the garment.

Eagle-eyed plus-sized fashion blogger Georgina Grogan spotted the weirdness, promptly tweeting a zoom-in, and invoking the ire of her followers in the process:

We can’t be certain, but it sure looks suspiciously like padding has been inserted beneath the plus-sized Ann Summers Curve Adorn lace and satin knickers. The item is also available in non-plus-sized sizes on the Ann Summers site, and being advertised in a slimmer size, is actually modelled by someone who fits in the piece. Which begs the question, why not simply hire models who fit the clothes, as for non-plus-sized items? It kind of defeats the point of selling plus-sized items in the first place, and makes a commitment from big brands to inclusivity ring pretty hollow – not to mention sending a poor message.

Sadly, it’s not the first time an online retailer has made such a misstep. Last year British online shop Boohoo was spotted with similar antics (albeit with no attempt to hide it) bizarrely using a size 6 model, to model plus-sized items.

The ensuing comments on Grogan’s tweet prompted some interesting discussion, with users sharing the practice of padding in the modelling industry:

In fact, Refinery29 took an in-depth look at the practice, finding it to be disappointingly commonplace within the world of plus-sized modelling.

As for ASOS, they staunchly deny claims of any such modifications, telling Cosmopolitan UK, “The images on site show the model’s natural body shape as it is with no padding or adjustment made.” Hmmm. Whether or not that’s the case is unclear, but hopefully we can all agree that anything that misrepresents or distorts body shapes to sell clothes, has no place in the fashion market.