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The Golden State Killer was one of America’s most notorious murderers in the 1970s and 80s. The man committed 12 homicides, over 100 burglaries and raped at least 46 women. He evaded capture for 40 years, but authorities in Sacramento County arrested the man they believe to be the Golden State Killer this week after renewed interest in the case was sparked by crime writer Michelle McNamara, the late wife of comedian Patton Oswalt, and new DNA evidence was found.

The suspect, 72-year-old Joseph James DeAngelo Jr. was arrested Tuesday morning and charged with eight counts of murder. The arrest came after a surveillance team retrieved DeAngelo’s DNA from an unspecified discarded item and matched it to samples left by the killer at crime scenes decades ago. DeAngelo was reportedly an ex-police officer who was fired from the force in 1976 for shoplifting.

The Killer’s crime spree ran from 1978 to 1986 and began in the very Sacramento suburbs where DeAngelo was living before his arrest. At the latter end of the 12-year span, similar crimes were committed further south which were linked to the Golden State Killer through DNA in 2000, though investigators were unable to produce a suspect. In 2016, the FBI offered up to $50,000 as a reward for information on the killer who they described as a 6-foot-tall white male, 60 to 75 years-old with blond or light brown hair. He was also thought to have some sort of military or law enforcement firearms training.

The police did not say what led them to surveil DeAngelo as a potential suspect this year, but coverage of the arrest is pointing to a true crime book released this past February. I’ll be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer was written by McNamara, who is also credited with popularizing the “Golden State Killer” name in her 2013 article about him in the Los Angeles Times. After her sudden death in 2016, Oswalt worked to get the book published posthumously.

When questioned about the book’s impact on the investigation, Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones said that I’ll be Gone in the Dark did not factor into the arrest.

“That’s a question we’ve gotten from all over the world in the past 24 hours,” he said at a press conference, “The answer is no.” Patton Oswalt disagrees. He said so on Twitter and also during his previously scheduled appearance on Late Night with Seth Meyers. Oswalt was slated to talk about his new show AP Bio, but news of the arrest overshadowed that instantly.

Oswalt’s current wife, Meredith Salenger, whom he married last year, also tweeted out her conviction that McNamara was crucial in the arrest, calling her “spectacular” and reaffirming her commitment to making sure that Oswalt’s daughter knows about her mother’s legacy.