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There are just so many things we take for granted. That cup of coffee in the morning. Tying our shoelaces. Being able to give a loved one a hug.

But if you happen to have an autistic family member, you may see those everyday things a little differently. At least that’s one of the lessons to be a learned from a Facebook video that’s going viral this week.

“You know how we say autism families don’t take things for granted? This is what we mean,” Mandy Farmer of From Motherhood writes on her page. “E is 6.5. Fine motor skills are so very far behind. He can’t write yet or draw a square. And honestly those things don’t concern me as much as the self-care fine motor issues. Opening packages, dressing, feeding himself with a utensil. People have no idea how hard our kids have to work to be able to accomplish these tasks consistently.”

Anyone watching Farmer’s accompanying video may have an idea though. In the two-minute clip the mother films her autistic son attempting to zip up his jacket. The kid is patient and excited as he demonstrates how the “zipper monster” and the “baby monster” will meet, but as the video goes on it’s clear that he’s struggling to do it.

“This is really hard,” he says at one point as his mother tries to help him by resetting his hands.

And just when you start to become as frustrated as E, he finally connects and zips the jacket up — all the way to the top. The look of pure joy on his face is brief since the video ends shortly thereafter, but it’s a look that’s totally worth it. In fact, that look coupled with his mother’s squeals of excitement may even bring a tear or two to your eye.

“There are so many therapies that can help, but so many do not have access to those therapies. [E] has been doing this program for about a month and is now zipping independently, but I want you to be mindful of how much effort it still takes,” Farmer writes.

“When we give our kids the opportunity they can work hard and reach a higher potential. The policy makers, school districts and insurance companies that refuse to invest in these therapies now are keeping these amazing individuals from becoming the most independent version of themselves. It is so exciting to see him meet these milestones, even if they’re met on a different timeline than that of his peers.”

Check out the full video for yourself.

 

You know how we say autism families don’t take things for granted? This is what we mean. E is 6.5. Fine motor skills are so very far behind. He can’t write yet or draw a square. And honestly those things don’t concern me as much as the self-care fine motor issues. Opening packages, dressing, feeding himself with a utensil. People have no idea how hard our kids have to work to be able to accomplish these tasks consistently. There are so many therapies that can help, but so many do not have access to those therapies. He has been doing this program for about a month and is now zipping independently, but I want you to be mindful of how much effort it still takes. When we give our kids the opportunity they can work hard and reach a higher potential. The policy makers, school districts and insurance companies that refuse to invest in these therapies now are keeping these amazing individuals from becoming the most independent version of themselves. It is so exciting to see him meet these milestones, even if they’re met on a different timeline than that of his peers.

Posted by From Motherhood by Mandy Farmer on Wednesday, March 8, 2017