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You’re going to need more than a life jacket to keep you safe this summer.

An abnormally high number of sharks are being spotted on the east coast. Or at least, that’s what many residents and tour companies have been reporting lately.

Last week, for example, sport fishers in St. Andrews spotted a great white shark circling waters near the Bay of Fundy.


Over the weekend, a group in St. Margarets Bay, N.S. were shooting video of a pod of porpoises when an unidentified shark suddenly blasted out of the water and attacked them.

That’s not all, either.

Bill Flower, of Lunenburg Ocean Adventures, told CTV News that he was taking a stag party on a tour of Nova Scotia’s South shore this weekend when he spotted a two-metre shark that he says could have either been a mako or a great white.

“I’m seeing more [sharks],” Flower said. “Not a lot, but … I’ve never seen a mako breach unless it’s on a hook before, and I saw one yesterday on a rough day and that was very unusual.”

Recent shark sightings in the U.S. have also led to the closure of several beaches in places such as Cape Cod, Massachusetts and Coney Island, New York.

The good news is, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans says it hasn’t received an increased number of shark sighting reports this year, and actually blamed the surge in sightings on cases of mistaken identity. Still, there is some evidence that suggests that as the world’s oceans get warmer as a result of climate change, sharks will begin to head further north than normal.

Which means, in theory, this could merely be the beginning of what’s to come.

*Gulp*