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We can all agree that Oprah won the Golden Globes and life itself with her instantly iconic “Time’s Up” speech as she accepted the Cecile B. DeMille award Sunday night. We cried, the audience spent half the time on their feet and we now measure time as BOS (Before Oprah Speech) and AOS (After Oprah Speech). Do we see an Oprah/Trump battle of the TV tycoons showdown in 2020? (Actually, no thanks. That sounds exhausting). Is it possible for someone to win an Emmy for a speech they gave at the Golden Globes?

While Oprah was legen–wait for it–dary last night, she wasn’t the only one who made a statement. There were a number of other women (and some men) who talked about Me Too, Time’s Up, the importance of truth, representation and equality in their acceptance speeches. Everyone (except James Franco) brought their A-game and few missed any on-camera opportunity to draw attention to all the long-silenced social issues that have been brought into the spotlight this past year. Here are some of the greatest speeches at the 2018 Golden Globes (you know, after Oprah’s).

Elizabeth Moss

Elisabeth Moss is the subject of some controversy because while everyone wants to love the adorable and well-spoken actress (and Peggy Olson will always hold a special place in our hearts) she is part of the church of Scientology. The church has come under fire in the past for allegedly covering up sexual assaults committed by its members among other unsavoury (and possibly illegal) practices.

Questionable origins aside, Moss’s speech was elegant and spoke to the tone of the evening. She read a quote from Margaret Atwood — the author of The Handmaid’s Tale book, on which Moss’s show is based.

“We were the people who were not in the papers. We lived in the blank white spaces at the edges of print. It gave us more freedom. We lived in the gaps between the stories,” Moss read before adding, “Margaret Atwood, this is for you and all the women who came before you and after you who were brave enough to speak out against intolerance and injustice and to fight for equality and freedom in this world.

“We no longer live in the blank white spaces at the edge of print. We no longer live in the gaps between the stories. We are the story in print, and we are writing the story ourselves.”

Laura Dern

It was also a big (HUGE) night for the women (and men) of Big Little Lies. Laura Dern was the show’s first winner (Best Supporting Actress) and she started them off with a bang, getting right into praise of silence breakers and steps toward a future where there isn’t silence to break.

“Many of us were taught not to tattle. It was a culture of silencing and it was normalized,” she said, “I urge all of us to not only support survivors and bystanders who are brave enough to tell their truth, but to promote restorative justice. May we also, please, protect and employ them. May we teach our children that speaking out without the fear of retribution is our culture’s new North Star.”

Nicole Kidman

Nicole Kidman killed the acceptance speech for her win at the Emmys and did the same at the Golden Globes last night. She spoke about the “power of women” that got the show done and made it as good as it is and the bond between the five female stars (Kidman, Dern, Reese Witherspoon, Zoe Kravitz and Shailene Woodley). She also thanked her mother, Janelle Kidman, who was a feminist activist.

“My mama was an advocate for the women’s movement when I was growing up, and because of her, I’m standing here,” she said, “My achievements are her achievements. Antonia Kidman, my sister, and I say, ‘Thank you Janelle Kidman, for what you fought for so hard.'”

She continued, “I do believe, and I hope, we can elicit change through the stories we tell and the way we tell them. Let’s keep that conversation alive. Let’s do it.” Then she finished with a little shoutout to hubby, Keith Urban.

“And Keith Urban, when my cheek is against yours, everything melts away and that is love.”

Reese Witherspoon

Reese didn’t come away with an individual award, but as one of the producers of the series, she was part of the Big Little Lies acceptance crew for their win for Best Miniseries. After creator and writer David E. Kelley made his thank-yous, he handed the mic over to Witherspoon to bring it home. And she sure did.

“I want to thank everyone who broke their silence this year and spoke up about abuse and harassment,” she said, “You are so brave. Hopefully, shows like this, more will be made, so that people who are feeling silenced by harassment, discrimination, abuse — time is up. We see you. We hear you. And we will tell your stories.”

Sterling K. Brown

You might recall at the Emmys where Sterling K. Brown made history for his win as Randall in This is Us and then they played him off and cut his mic before he even got to thank his wife. The producers at the GGs didn’t make the same mistake. Brown got to say everything he intended to. Oh, and he also made history again by becoming the first African American man to win Best Actor in a Drama Series at the Golden Globes.

“Dan Fogelman, you wrote a role for a black man that can only be played by a black man,” he said, addressing the series writer, “What I appreciate so much about this thing is that I’m being seen for who I am and appreciated for who I am. It makes it that much more difficult to dismiss me and dismiss anybody who looks like me.”

Meher Tatna

The president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association received some flack for being one of only a few people to not participate in the red carpet blackout. She proudly wore her “Time’s Up” pin and explained to the press that she picked out the dress with her mother who would be watching from Mumbai. In Indian culture, it is customary to wear bright colours — never black — to celebrations. “So [my mother] would be appalled if I were to [have] worn black,” she said, “And so this is for my mom.”

In her speech, she referenced the Time’s Up movement and also emphasized the importance of journalism at a time when truth is so hard to discern. She also pledged, on behalf of the HFPA, two $1 million grants to non-profit organizations that support journalism.

“As artists, you bravely tell stories that enable us to see the world through the eyes of another,” she said, “These stories are our best hope of reflecting the world we want to live in. We are privileged to share your work with the world.”

Frances McDormand

In case you couldn’t tell by the overwhelming applause that she got when her name was read in the list of nominees, Frances McDormand won the GG for Best Actress in a Drama for her portrayal of Mildred Hayes in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. While she asserted that she likes to keep her politics private, that didn’t stop her from thanking everybody else for sharing theirs.

“As many of you know, I keep my politics to myself, but it was really great to be in this room,” she said, tearing up, “And to be a part of the tectonic shift in our industry’s power structure. Trust me, the women in this room tonight are not here for the food. We are here for the work.”

Bonus: Natalie Portman’s savagery

Natalie Portman wasn’t nominated for anything this year, but she and Ron Howard were stuck following Oprah’s showstopper of a speech to announce the nominees for Best Director of a Drama. After making the only face one could possibly make when you’re forced to follow THE Oprah Winfrey, she shaded the Hollywood Free Press’s less-than-equal nomination pool.

“And here are the all male nominees,” the actress announced. In a year where Lady Bird, directed by Greta Gerwig and winner of Best Drama and Wonder Woman, directed by Patty Jenkins, were both eligible, it doesn’t make sense that there were only male nominees. Portman’s comment also drew some pretty hilarious faces from the audience.

Hopefully speeches like these are the new norm (until they don’t have to be anymore).