Entertainment Celebrity
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

With every royal wedding it seems like we learn more about the traditions that come with being a member of the British monarchy. With Meghan and Prince Harry, we learned that their titles won’t be passed to daughters, tiaras can’t be worn until marriage, and brides aren’t supposed to give speeches at their weddings. Thanks to a new interview with royal expert Marlene Koenig, we’ve also learned that the Queen technically has custody of Will and Kate’s three children and Harry and Meghan’s future kids.

So, a little more serious than tiaras, unless you really like tiaras.

Speaking to The Sun, Koenig said, “the sovereign has legal custody of the minor grandchildren,” meaning Queen Elizabeth technically has custody of George, Charlotte, Louis, and Harry and Meghan’s future children while they’re underage. Well, at least there’s no concern about the Markle family fighting for custody.

According to Koenig, the law dates back to 1717 and was put into place by King George I because of his poor relationship with his own son. It makes sense. The world was a death trap in 1717 and King George I wanted to make sure his grandchildren were looked after should his son die before him.

The law also states that “right of supervision extended to his grandchildren and this right of right belongs to His Majesty, King of the Realm, even during their father’s lifetime,” which means that when Queen Elizabeth dies, the custody of the royal children is passed to the new ruler, their grandfather Prince Charles.

Koenig explained that the law is still having an impact on how royal children are raised, with Prince Charles and the late Princess Diana often asking the Queen for permission when traveling with William and Harry, something Kate and William have also done with their children.

Three hundred years later, the law is technically still in place, but we don’t know that 92-year-old Queen Elizabeth would actually implement it should something happen to her grandchildren. They’re a bit more work than Corgis and she doesn’t even have any of those anymore. Plus, the Queen still has an entire empire to look after, but you know, it pretty much runs itself at this point.