Style Fashion
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

A person’s wedding day should be the happiest day of their life, but for one bride, the journey to the wedding turned her fairytale into a nightmare.

Bride Yewande Oteh was traveling with her family from Philadelphia to Jamaica in August 2015 to get married at her grandparent’s hotel in Montego Bay. While checking in to her American Airline flight, a ticket agent told Oteh not to check her wedding dress and instead hang it in a closet at the front of the plane.

Once Oteh boarded the plane, she was informed by a flight attendant that she was not allowed to use the closet, which was reserved for American Airline staff. In a lawsuit filed by Oteh against American Airlines, Oteh alleges that the flight attendant became ‘indignant and agitated’ and laughed when Oteh responded that she was planning on filing a complaint.

Oteh eventually placed her dress in an empty overhead bin in first class, far from her seat at the back of the plane. Once the plane landed, Oteh retrieved her dress from the overhead bin and found that it had been soaked in red wine.

In the lawsuit, Oteh says she and her husband watched the bin for the duration of the flight and witnessed two flight attendants put something in the bin.

After landing in Jamaica, Oteh’s sister flew to Florida in an effort to find a new wedding dress for her sister. Several gowns (which could not be fitted or returned) were purchased. Oteh says that the physical and emotional ramifications of having her dress ruined caused her to cancel previously planned events, which diminished her enjoyment of her wedding.

Now Oteh is suing American Airlines for a total of $3.4 million, citing four counts of negligence including negligent infliction of emotional distress, causing a ‘lifetime of damage.’ While the flight attendant is not being sued personally, she is listed in Oteh’s 31-page lawsuit, falling under American Airlines ‘negligent hiring and retention.’ As for the flight attendant, she maintains that the events described by Oteh are far from the truth, saying “It really didn’t go like that at all.”

It seems surprising that a commercial airline as big as American Airlines would have any issues storing a wedding dress either in the closet or overhead bin considering the popularity of destination weddings.

Will Oteh’s dress disaster come with a million dollar ending? Stay tuned.