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Saturday night, Canadian skicross racer David Duncan, his wife Maja Duncan and Alpine Canada High Performance Director Willy Raine were arrested for drunkenly steeling and driving a Hummer in South Korea. The trio climbed into the idling vehicle while intoxicated and drove around in the stolen car.

The group was released later Saturday night and fined a collective 7 million South Korean won for their actions. David and Maja were each reportedly fined 1 million won ($1,174 CAD) and Raine, who was the driver, was fined 5 million won ($5,880 CAD). They will not be permitted to leave the country until the fines are paid. They were also forbidden from participating in the Olympics Closing Ceremonies Sunday.

David and Maja released a joint statement late Saturday apologizing for their behaviour.

“We are deeply sorry. We engaged in behaviour that demonstrated poor judgment and was not up to the standards expected of us as Members of the Canadian Olympic Team or as Canadians,” they wrote. Raine issued a separate apology.

“Words are not enough to express how sorry I am,” he said, “I have let my teammates, friends and my family down. I would also like to apologize to the owner of the vehicle that was involved.”

After a record-breaking successful Olympics for Canada, Canadians are deeply disappointed in the way Duncan and Raine have closed the games for the country. Less controversial than the Ryan Lochte fiasco of 2016, but that’s not much of a comfort to Canadians who expect more from their athletic representatives.

CBC News also tracked down the alleged owner of the Hummer that was stolen and shared the damage. Young Gil Ahn said at the time that none of the athletes had apologized to him directly, although their statements address “the owner of the vehicle.”

Hopefully this is the only time Canadians are involved in an incident like this.