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Even though humans have been all the way to the moon and back, there are still parts of the ocean that are shrouded in more mystery than space.

Particularly, we’re talking about what lies at the very bottom of the water’s depth. And once you get down there, you learn that the ocean isn’t all that different from what you’d find beyond our planet’s atmosphere. There’s no light at the very bottom of the ocean, the water creates a feeling of weightlessness and alien-like animals we haven’t even discovered yet roam freely.

Fortunately, we may soon know more about Earth’s most unexplored frontier.

Canada is joining a new mission to explore areas off of Bermuda, Nova Scotia and the Sargasso Sea to map unknown areas, discover new species and measure human impact on marine life. To do that, they’re going to send divers down–way down (about 1,000 metres)–to see if they can dig up answers to some of the ocean’s greatest mysteries.

More specifically, Canadian researchers will have their sights set on the endangered Northern bottlenose whale. Their existence is somewhat of a mystery, and the government needs more information to help ramp up conservation efforts.

“It’s not like [bottlenose whales are] small. And we know they’re not eating fish, which would be the logical thing,” Fisheries Department research scientist Ellen Kenchington said. “The whale scientists tell us that they’re eating only one species of squid.”

The problem is, only a handful of squid have ever been spotted in the area where the whales live.

Experts say that the ocean is about 95 per cent unexplored. Needless to say, Canadian researchers have their work cut out for them. You can learn more about the mission in the video above.