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In Cape Breton, they’re calling it the “Trump bump.”

It’s a term that refers to the rise in the number of American tourists who have been visiting the island recently, all thanks to the Republican presidential candidate. You probably know by now that many Americans have threatened to move to Canada if Trump manages to win the election. Well, instead of building a wall to stop them, Cape Breton DJ Rob Calabrese created a website back in February which pitched his beautiful island home as a potential go-to destination for American political refugees, er, immigrants.

And now, six months later, those Americans are starting to arrive.

“The Trump bump is something we can absolutely see on our websites,” Marty Stevens, Director of Marketing for Tourism Nova Scotia said, referring to internet traffic. “We’re seeing some real growth.”

She says that tourism overall has increased eight per cent on the island when compared to last year. Bookings for overnight accommodation in Cape Breton are also up 16 per cent. But the most telling numbers come from the airports: Stevens says the number of tourists flying into Nova Scotia from the U.S. have skyrocketed by a whopping 45 per cent this year.

So while we can’t say for sure how many of those Americans are considering moving to Cape Breton, they certainly seem interested. Who could blame them?

Cabot Trail
The Cabot Trail. Credit: CP

Stevens did say, however, that the numbers could be attributed to other factors besides Trump. The weaker loonie might be helping, along with a new, direct flight being offered between Boston and Halifax.

Still, while many Americans may be concerned about what Trump could do to their country if he takes power, he certainly seems to be doing some good for Nova Scotia.