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Like most women, Chloe Grace Moretz knows the struggles that comes with maintaining clear skin, especially if you’re prone to acne breakouts.

Recently, the 21-year-old singer-model-actress was approached by Japanese beauty brand, SK-II to participate in their #bareskinproject campaign, a series of images that would feature makeup-free, unretouched photos. Much to our surprise, Chloe, a body confidence advocate, revealed that she didn’t initially jump at the chance go bare faced for the brand.

“It’s always a scary idea — the thought of being bare skinned in a campaign like that,” she told Teen Vogue. “It’s something that I had never thought would be possible.”

In her teenage years, Chloe struggled with cystic acne, a severe skin condition where pores become blocked, causing infection and inflammation.

“I think what people don’t talk about is the psychological element to having skin problems, and that was the hardest thing for me. It strips your self-confidence in a lot of ways; you know you can’t hide from it at all, and you lose a little piece of yourself,” she said.

For Chloe, some of those insecurities were brought back by the thought of being bare-faced in front of the world. However ultimately, the chance to show young girls that their bare skin is enough was all it took to convince Chloe to participate in the ad.

Seen below is Chloe, bare-faced and beautiful as ever. According to InStyle, the only product used on her skin was SK-II’s Facial Treatment Essence, a gentle skin exfoliant used to refine pores, even skin tone, prevent wrinkles, and provide a healthy glow.

“The reality is that we all get blemishes. We all get stress breakouts, especially when we get hormonal shifts. I think that being transparent up-front about that as a celebrity,” Chloe told Teen Vogue. “Having that platform to be as transparent as possible with the realities and skin troubles that we all go through on a daily basis — is the first step to changing the ideals of what beauty is.”

Based on her previous history working with brands, Photoshop seems to be something that Chloe certainly tries to avoid. According to her, if Chloe could give her younger-self a piece of advice, it would be to stop getting so caught up in trying to be someone you’re not!

BRB: trying find a way to mail our younger selves that same piece of advice.

SK-II’s short, clear skin film featuring Chloe drops on their Instagram on June 29.