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Henry Winkler is so darn sweet, we swear the man could be Canadian. During his Monday night appearance on Lights Outs with David Spade alongside Barry co-stars Bill Hader and D’Arcy Carden he reminded us of that fact tenfold with a cute grandpa moment and some fan appreciation.

After attempting (and failing) to subtly take some photos of his castmates with his phone while Spade did his monologue (gotta do it for the ‘gram), Winkler addressed the fans he’s accrued over decades in the business. Basically, whether you think of him as The Fonz or Jean-Ralphio’s dad Dr. Saperstein from Parks and Recreation, you’re a valued member of the community.

“You know something is happening when you’re walking through an airport,” he explained. “There’s the Happy Days contingent, there is the Scream and Waterboy contingent, the Parks and Rec contingent. There is the Arrested Development contingent. And now, I am stopped almost exclusively for Barry.”

Winkler is pretty well known for being open to fan photos and spontaneous chats on the street—that fun guy image is no act. He shared a story on Jimmy Kimmel Live! recently about a time during Happy Days rehearsals when he saved a young fan’s life. He explained that an Illinois state trooper reached out to him, saying he had a 17-year-old kid on a ledge threatening to jump off and that he would only talk to Winkler.

“I don’t know where I got the nerve to take the phone and start talking to this kid,” he said. The teen, named John, was an aspiring actor who was dejected about his career. Shifting the conversation to records, Winkler was able to successfully talk John off the ledge.

Winkler isn’t just awesome one-on-one, he’s also an advocate for a whole group of kids who live with learning disabilities. Dyslexic himself, he authored the award-winning children’s book series Hank Zipner, which he ensured children with dyslexia would be able to read by making them easier to focus on. “Kids who have never read before, reluctant readers, can read my books,” he said in an interview with The Guardian.

We can’t wait to see more of Winkler’s singular charm on display when he attends the Emmy Awards as a nominee for Best Supporting Actor after taking home the trophy last year. The Emmys air Sunday, September 22 on CTV.