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July and August have always been the hottest summer months. But in Southern Ontario, this week’s drought has been nearly unbearable, mocking us as we become drenched in sweat. It’s hot as hell out there. And honestly, the beautiful sunshine isn’t exactly what our crops need to survive right now. They need water ASAP.

As it stands, a lot of people are worried that food prices will rise quite a bit because of the drought. Temperatures have reached well over 30C, making our hair frizz, our throats parched and our crops wilt. But why exactly should this matter to you? Well, a smaller crop yield translates into higher prices at the grocery store–just what we needed.

Hugh Earl, an Associate Professor at Guelph University’s Agricultural College, says that “Temperature is something that growers have no control over.” He does, however, explain how farmers may sometimes choose crops that will mature sooner to avoid being at an important stage during the hottest part of the season. So our farmer’s have already done all they can.

While we don’t need to worry about wheat-based products (because they’ve all been harvested already) or soybeans, corn isn’t looking so hot right now. And neither are many other veggies. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Spokesman Charles-Antoine Dubois, veggies like broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage aren’t doing well since their roots don’t go very deep in the ground, leaving them vulnerable to hot weather. Again, that means higher veggie prices for the year.

Check out the video above to learn more about how this drought could affect your wallet.