Health Wellness
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Gwyneth Paltrow has established herself and her brand, Goop, as the be all and end all of women’s health. If you want to cleanse, primp, polish, balance or do any other equally vague thing to your body, Goop has fifteen products and three pages of advice on how to do it. Gwyneth Paltrow’s a celebrity, what she recommends is probably the best right? And just look at her. If she does it, it has to be good for you. Well, according to doctors, that’s not necessarily true.

Many health care professionals have spoken out against Goop products in the past, but one Canadian doctor is getting some serious attention from the celeb herself for her criticisms. Jennifer Gunter is a board-certified OB/GYN in both Canada and the United States and has a total of 17 letters after her name (yeah, she’s that legit). Dr. Gunter has been known to critique Goop heavily–and sometimes profanely–on her own health blog and speak out against products like a jade egg you stick up your vagina to increase sexual health and pleasure.

Gunter started her blog after having increasing numbers of women come to her with ineffective or harmful theories or products they heard about online. She knew that for every woman who asked her about something, there were others who would just do it. Add in Paltrow’s celebrity status and that’s another reason for women to blindly believe her products are healthy.

‘I believe women can only be empowered if they have good health information’ Gunter told Your Morning, ‘And that health information clearly shouldn’t be coming from Gwyneth Paltrow.’

Goop is just one source of the many health myths Gunter has set out to debunk, but apparently Gwyneth Paltrow couldn’t stand that harsh criticism about her brand being out in the universe. Earlier this month, the website published a piece written by their doctors calling out Gunter by name and ‘explaining’ in very condescending tones why their products are legitimate.

‘Since her first post, [Dr. Gunter] has been taking advantage of the attention and issuing attacks to build her personal platform—ridiculing the women who might read our site in the process,’ the post reads, ‘As women, we chafe at the idea that we are not intelligent enough to read something and take what serves us, and leave what does not.’

The post contradicts itself somewhat by asserting that Goop products and doctors are legitimate while also saying that women are able to discern what from their website will work for them and what will not. Two of Goop’s doctors also wrote short pieces at the end of the post where they share their own credentials and one in particular ‘mansplains’ modern medicine to Gunter directly. His section will seriously make you cringe.

Gunter responded with another blog post where she calls out the clear sexism of Dr. Steven Gundry’s writing and again implores women to think more critically about where their medical advice is coming from.

The second doctor has since come out to say that she does not give Goop a blanket endorsement.

So the big takeaway here is definitely to do your research before you use a product or technique that was not recommended to you by a doctor. You should also talk to your doctor about any remedies or cleanses you read about online. Even Gunter’s website includes a disclaimer that reads, ‘Nothing that is posted here should be taken as a substitute for medical advice.’ Maybe we’ll just stick to Goop’s recipes and culture sections and leave the actual health stuff to the professionals.