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We all know that unpleasant feeling of stepping into a heaping pile of dog turd.

It begins with the soft compression of your foot, followed by your heart sinking into the bottom of your chest cavity and the slow realization of what you’ve just done.

And that’s when you smell it.

Dog

Dog.

Of course, by the time it’s all over your shoe, the dog’s lazy owner is long gone. This leaves you (the innocent in this matter) to frantically look for the nearest stick to scrape it off.

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could finally have justice?

Well, take heart, crap-covered victims. This smelly plague may soon be a thing of the past. DNA matching services like PooPrints Canada are popping up all over North America, and these companies allow you to connect the dog (and its owner) to that awful turd you just stepped in.

The way it works is simple: Dog owners wishing to move into a property would first be required to get a cheek swab from their pet and submit it to the company. After that, the owner and property manager receive a registration number, which can be used to trace any crap they find on the property back to the dog.

Which means it’s time for some sweet, sweet revenge.

Dog

“We’ve had a lot of interest from properties across Canada,” PooPrints Canada Operations Manager Maggie Ashley said, adding that even some cities are considering the service.

The company, which has only been in Canada for about a year, already serves 50 properties (some which house over a thousand dogs). And apparently, it’s getting results.

“Their waste problem pretty much disappears overnight,” she said.

It seems property managers spend a lot of money picking up unscooped dog waste. The average dog produces 270 pounds of it per year, which is why some municipalities are forced to waste hundreds of thousands of dollars every year picking it up. And when you consider dog turd is as toxic as some chemical oil spills, this service seems a lot more appealing.

Otherwise, as Ashley says, “You’ve got a lot of crap to deal with.”

To find the “poopetrator” in your neighbourhood, check out PooPrints’ website.