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Donald Trump has been surrounded by a cloud of legal uncertainty pretty much since the moment he took office. Russia collusion, campaign finance violations, paying off porn stars, you name it, he (or one of his friends) is probably suspected of it. All that legal drama came to a head Tuesday afternoon when two of Trump’s former closest allies were found guilty of CRIMES.

Within the span of an hour both former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort and former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen were announced guilty in separate-but-related cases. While cable news blew up, the president’s only response to the matters at hand were short and didn’t include comment on Cohen at all, even though he was hosting another one of his freewheeling campaign rallies in West Virginia Tuesday night.

Seems like he was saving it all for Wednesday morning when he let loose in a characteristic Twitter storm (although his tweets were surprisingly devoid of incorrect capitalization).

Paul Manafort was Donald Trump’s presidential campaign chair from March to August of 2016 — a crucial time for the campaign — and was indicted for several counts of tax fraud, money laundering and conspiracy against the United States back in October along with his associate Rick Gates.

For the past two weeks, Manafort has been on trial for 18 charges brought against him by the special counsel led by Robert Mueller. The jury, after several days of deliberation, ordered a mistrial on 10 counts, but found Manafort guilty on eight of them including five counts of tax fraud, two of bank fraud and one charge of hiding foreign bank accounts. The 69-year-old is looking at a potential 80 years in prison.

If you’re thinking, “wow, that’s wild!” Buckle up, because within the same hour, Trump’s former attorney and “fixer” Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to facilitating payments to women at the direction of the then-presidential candidate to help him in the election — a clear violation of campaign finance law since Trump has said repeatedly that he didn’t know about it.

Cohen’s plea deal says that he made payments to various people to keep information that could be damaging to the campaign from the public “in coordination and at the direction of a candidate for federal office.” That “candidate” is understood to be Donald Trump; he is unnamed in the plea because it is customary not to use the names of unindicted co-conspirators in situations such as these.

So what’s the big deal?

First of all, there is speculation that Manafort will flip on the president and share everything he knows about potential Russia dealings ahead of his sentencing to hopefully reduce it. It is unclear if he actually knows anything of value to the special counsel or if a deal is even on the table. It’s also possible that Manafort is hoping for an official pardon from Trump, which is looking like a possibility judging by how “very badly” he feels.

Oh Cohen, Cohen, Cohen. The president’s former attorney could prove to be his biggest pain of all. Cohen has tapes of his dealings with the president and has said that he would testify that Donald Trump knew about the Trump Tower meeting between Don Jr. and a Russian lawyer working for the Russian government for dirt on Hillary Clinton — possibly the smoking gun in the Russia collusion case.

It’s also clear that Cohen is Capital-D Done with Trump. His lawyer, Lanny Davis, was making the news circuit Wednesday, announcing that not only would Cohen testify against Trump without an immunity deal, he would reject a pardon from Trump should the president offer it (which seems pretty unlikely at this point).

So while Trump breaking campaign finance law by not reporting the payments he made to women to keep them quiet during the campaign is pretty substantial in itself (it could hold a penalty of $250,000 in fines and five years in prison), Cohen may have some much more significant dirt on him. Like, impeachment-worthy dirt.

It’s probably still too soon to start planning the impeachment party, but Trump’s job security probably isn’t as stable as he’d like it to be right now.