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Don’t you just wish there was a pill you could take to make things a little easier? Of course you do, because we all do. That’s why there are pills for everything from weight loss to vitamin supplements to beauty enhancers these days.

It’s no secret that some of these tablets and capsules are better than others, of course. So when it comes time to flooding your body with anything, it’s always best to seek out the advice of your doctor. In the meantime the FDA wants to make one thing very, very clear: when it comes to companies trying to sell you a sunscreen pill, well they’re just blowing sunshine up your keister.

That’s right, as tempting as it sounds to just pop a little pill and instantly avoid all of those bad UV rays without having to deal with the greasy mess that is sunscreen, these pills don’t deliver on their promise.

“We’ve found products purporting to provide protection from the sun that aren’t delivering the advertised benefits,” an official release from the FDA this week reads. “Instead they’re misleading consumers, and putting people at risk. Today we sent warning letters to companies illegally marketing pills and capsules labeled as dietary supplements that make unproven drug claims about protecting consumers from the harms that come from sun exposure without meeting the FDA’s standards for safety and effectiveness.”

According to the release the products in question include Advanced Skin Brightening Formula, Sunsafe Rx, Solaricare and Sunergetic, and the way they’re being marketed has people using them and then basking in the sun thinking they’re totally safe.

“They are putting people’s health at risk by giving consumers a false sense of security that a dietary supplement could prevent sunburn, reduce early skin aging caused by the sun, or protect from the risks of skin cancer,” the release continues. “These companies were instructed to correct all violations associated with their products and were advised to review product websites and product labeling to ensure that the claims they are making don’t violate federal law.”

So if a little pill can’t help protect you against such things this summer, what can? Sunscreen and protective clothing remain safe bets, at least. The official recommendation remains to use an SPF of 30 or higher at least 30 minutes before going outside, and to reapply every two hours — more often if you plan on sweating or going swimming.

Fun in the sun indeed.