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There are a number of reasons to be concerned about the Canada Post strike but Santa not getting your kids’ Christmas wish lists isn’t one of them. Since 1981, kiddies (and adults too) have been able to write the man in red by addressing their letters to Santa Clause at the North Pole, H0H 0H0, Canada and that’s not going to change this year. A Canada Post spokesperson told Global News that parents should continue to send letters to that address and can expect responses from Santa as long as they send them early enough.

“We continue to operate through the rotating strikes and continue to process Santa’s letters,” said spokesman Jon Hamilton in an email. “We’ve also had volunteers at parades gathering the letters.”

“Parents should continue sending Santa letters from their children. Helping Santa with his letters is a longstanding tradition at Canada Post,” he said.

A spokesperson for the Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) agreed with the sentiment but warned the service will be slower than other years. He said postal workers can still volunteer for the program but with the current mail backlog, they can’t make guarantees about timing.

So, best to sit the kids down ASAP to write those Santa letters. The Canada Post website suggests writing before December 10 to receive a reply from the Big Man before Christmas.

Written replies come from a group of Postal Elves who work more than 260,000 hours around the Holidays to write to each and every kid who sends a letter to Santa. The earlier you send, the better.

The CUPW rejected Canada Post’s latest offer at the end of last week and may enter into a “cooling-off period,” as proposed by CP, for the next two months to address the demands of the holiday season. The federal government also tabled back-to-work legislation since the postal service is a defined essential service. The union has been vocal about their outrage over the move.

There is currently a 30-day backlog in the Canadian mail service and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales promising an increase in packages entering the system, plus holiday shopping, the delays will likely worsen until the rolling strikes come to an end.